A Golden Age Nuptial? Or Two? Or Three or None?

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A Golden Age Nuptial? Or Two? Or Three or None?

Postby SirVincentofNarnia » Aug 05, 2019 8:52 pm

The Golden Age is intriguing, a time of prosperity, Two Kings and Two Queens to rule in Cair Paravel, then in the end, hunt a white stag back home, but what if a marriage or two happened during this period? Now I am of the opinion that Queen Susan the Gentle probably would have never married, and that King Peter and Queen Lucy might have. But all of that is just speculation and theory. So what do you think? Knowing the Four and their characteristics, is it possible that a marriage could have happened? If so which ones and why? Or are you of the opinion that this just belongs in the speculation bin?
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The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

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Re: A Golden Age Nuptial? Or Two? Or Three or None?

Postby aileth » Aug 06, 2019 10:16 am

Well, it's mentioned in the post-coronation paragraphs in LWW that there were plenty of suitors for both Susan and Lucy. (None of them, apparently, were married in HHB, which was about twelve years into their reign, wasn't it?) However, it seems that they were quite happy to remain as they were, ruling together as co-monarchs. There is no hint that anything had altered (or any of them had altared?) when they were hunting the white stag.

I think it would have posed major problems for them if they had been married, and then gone back to being children in England. To be sure, they would have been well widowed by the time they returned in PC. But it almost makes you wonder if that couldn't have been a factor in what ultimately went wrong with Susan? Not that she had actually married, but that it had made her think along those lines at such an early time, relative to her stage of life in England. Or maybe not.
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