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Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

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Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Jan 04, 2011 2:53 am

I thought it would be a great idea to make a reference list of all the words in the Narnia books that may be foreign to modern readers. Also, some words have changed their meaning or can be used in variety of contexts.

Here's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.




LWW - from the Lions, 1992 edition.

row p.10
a noisy argument

wireless p.11
radio

blue-bottle p.12
a species of fly (not a blue-coloured bottle, nor a cornflower, grape hyacinth, jellyfish or a blue-uniformed police officer) =))
http://209.210.60.109/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=2505&PID=128688#128688

looking-glass p.11
mirror

queer p.13
strange, unusual or weird

jollification p. 21
joyful celebrations

stole p. 25
moving secretly or quietly

pax p.32
British school slang for calling a truce

pray p.33
ask

poor sport p.42
a bad idea

sharp's the word p.51
keep your eyes open

trippers p.52
people who go on pleasure trips or excursions

by Jove p.53
a word of surprise

bagged p.54
stolen

prigs p.55
self-righteous people

wash-out p.56
total failure

Chatelaine p.57
the mistress of a castle

larder p.58
a pantry or supply of food

boughs p.64
main branches of a tree

burring p.68
small machinery sounds

range p.70
a large portable/stationary cooking stove with a top surface burner and one or two ovens

marmalade roll p.71
sweet pastry dish

stratagem p.74
a plan or trick to surprise or deceive the enemy

pedlars
people who sell items or services from door to door

Lilith p.77
a female demon from Jewish mysticism, said to dwell in lonely places and attack children. Also Adam's first wife, before Eve (not biblical)

Jinn p.77
spirits from Islamic mythology that can take human or animal form and influence people to good or evil

crock p.93
a clay pot or jar

plaguey p.96
to be annoying

frowsty p.98
musty, smelling bad

ramped p.100
to rise or stand on hind legs

grave p.101
solemn, serious

dog-fox p.105
a male fox

gaiety p.105
to be cheerful

crocuses p.111
a species of flowering plant

larches p.111
deciduous conifer trees

laburnums
a species of shrub with yellow flowers

velvet p.118
when a cat keeps its claws retracted inside its paws, so that no-one gets scratched (thanks to WaggaWagga)

Boggles p.123
Scottish hobgoblins

Cruels p. 123
(unknown)

people of the Toadstools p.123
(unknown)

Incubuses p. 138
handsome male demons with bat-like wings. They're known for charming women

Horrors p. 138
(unknown)

Efreets p.138
spirits from Arabic and Islamic mythology, similar to Jinn. Known for their strength and cunning

Orknies p.138
very mischievious little creatures

Wooses p.138
nasty, fat little creatures

Ettins p.138
giants with two-heads

whet p.140
to sharpen the blade of a tool or weapon

skirling p.142
a high, shrill, wailing tone (not unlike the bagpipes)

gorse bushes p.150
prickly evergreen shrubs

fusty p. 155
smelling stale, damp or stuffy

muck sweat p.157
sweating profusely

saccharine tablet p.157
a sugar substitute in tablet form

charge p.163
care, being looked after

gay p.167
lively and cheerful

consorts p.167
companions

quarry p.167
prey

signification p.169
something that has meaning

score p.170
the old imperial term for twenty (thanks to WaggaWagga)
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby HighQueenofNarnia » Jan 05, 2011 7:28 pm

Thank you, Warrior 4 Jesus! That is indeed very helpful. :ymapplause:

The first one I thought of is at the end of LB, when Edmund is talking about his "rather sore knee, from a hack at rugger."
This confused me to no end until eventually I read that "rugger" means rugby. And I think "a hack" is a bruise. Can anyone tell me if I'm right or wrong? :-\
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby coracle » Jan 05, 2011 9:21 pm

A hack is likely to mean where he got hit or kicked.
“Not all of us can choose what we give up. The things we love are taken or are never ours at all. If we’re lucky, life is defined not by what we let go, but what we let in: friendship and kind words, frailty and hope.”

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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Jan 05, 2011 10:15 pm

HighQueenofNarnia, glad I could help out. Compiling such a list takes time and effort but I enjoyed doing it. Prince Caspian is up next. As for Edmund's comment, I recognised the word 'rugger' as rugby but to me, a 'hack' is a violent cough. Coracle thanks for sharing the proper meaning behind the word. I've amended the entry you asked me too - hope it's okay now.
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Kira » Jan 06, 2011 2:22 am

Excellent work! That must have been time consuming! I don't think I would have been up to compiling such an impressive list. :)
I have to say though, I find it discouraging the lack of words the average modern reader knows. Not only in reference to this, but just in general.
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Jill » Jan 06, 2011 7:50 am

Thanks so much for this! I knew many of the words already but it was still really useful. It must have taken so much time!
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby ChristProclamer » Jan 07, 2011 2:12 pm

Hmm. It's a nice list, I guess. But I first read the Chronicles when I was 12, and I never had any problems with defining any of the words (except perhaps chatelaine, and I figured that one out from context). I know it's shocking, but yes, even 'illiterate' Americans such as myself are not so dumb as to not be able to read a children's book without a dictionary.

*cough*

Anyways. Looking forward to what you come up with next...
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Jan 07, 2011 6:05 pm

Wow. Nice, thanks for that - I find your post a bit rude. Many of us first read the books when we were much younger (7-8 years old) and may have taken the same understandings of the words through-out our life. I could guess most of the meanings of the words from their contexts too (there were some the surprised me though) but you could be more polite about it. Finally, it's not asking too much to use a dictionary to decipher a text that was written 60 years ago. Times have changed and some of the dialogue Lewis used was even old-school back when he wrote the Narnia books. Less pride and more humility wouldn't go astray. Thanks
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jan 07, 2011 7:28 pm

Yes, W4J, I think you are perfectly right. And I thank you very much for your efforts. :ymapplause: It would take some doing for all the books, but I am glad you have done it for LWW, at least. It is not only that there may be terms not commonly used even when I first read the books, when I was aged at about 9 - 10. (I'd have read them earlier but was banned from the school library before that age. :D )

The problem is that even simple everyday words, like gay, queer, crock or even blue-bottle have changed their former quite innocent meanings, sometimes quite signficantly since I was born after the end of WW2, the era in which these books are set. Yes the word crock used to refer to a clay pot, and we have slow-cookers called crock pots, but today when I hear something or someone is an old crock, I think that it is no good or the person has multiple complaints, not necessarily in health. Worse still, I might start looking for the crocodile referred to, since croc is the shortened form of what we call a crocodile here in Oz. :D ;)

Change in other words reflect changes in technology such as wireless, what we used to call the old receivers which transmitted the news of the outbreak of WW2, for example, or the news of JFK's assassination. Transistor radios became very popular throughout the 1960's, and by that time, all radios however they were powered, were called radios, or trannies (short for transistor) or walkmans, later still. It is odd that the term wireless has made a startling comeback since now 'wireless' refers to a method of Internet service, which is independent of telephone cabling, unlike dial-up.

I hope that as a literate (I hope) Australian, I might be able to lend a hand to W4J if he doesn't mind. I wouldn't mind doing for HHB what he has done for LWW.

Thank you, again, Warrior 4 Jesus! That is indeed very helpful.

HighQueenofNarnia wrote:The first one I thought of is at the end of LB, when Edmund is talking about his "rather sore knee, from a hack at rugger."
This confused me to no end until eventually I read that "rugger" means rugby. And I think "a hack" is a bruise. Can anyone tell me if I'm right or wrong?


Yes you are mostly right. "Rugger" does refer to Rugby, more particularly the code of football called Rugby Union, played in many countries of the world, including the constituent parts of UK, France, Romania, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and elsewhere. Even the USA, I've heard. /:) "Rugger" does not generally refer to Rugby League where the terminology is slightly different, even though both forms have 'rucks', 'tackles' and 'tries'. I don't remember if Rugby Union has scrums or field goals, let alone 'hacks', which I took to be a Rugby term rather than the bad bruise or contusion it gave to Edmund.
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Jan 07, 2011 8:38 pm

Good on you, Wagga! It would be great to see your list of HHB words. Currently I'm doing PC's but LWW and PC are my least favourite Narnia books (moreso LWW because it's overdone). Because of this, I'm finding reading them (to create the lists) to be a bit of a chore.

Sorry folks, it could be a few days until the next one is up.
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jan 09, 2011 2:41 am

This list is from The Horse and His Boy, published in paperback by Collins in 1980, (Grafton imprint). I haven't put in Calormene terms like Tisroc or Tarkaan since they are already explained quite well. Also, I didn't want to duplicate all of W4J's efforts with LWW.

Indigence p. 11. Hopeless poverty, or extreme lack of money. I agree the context in HHB already does imply poverty, but indigence is often confused with highly similar sounding words like ‘indigenous’ which apply to those native to a particular locality, rather than those poverty stricken people who are ‘destitute’ (HHB. p.15).

scimitar p. 11 . A type of curved sword used in the old pre-1918 Turkish Ottoman Empire military, which is distinctly different from the piratical cutlass, beloved of Hollywood. Called by various names in South-West Asia, Northern Africa or the Indian Subcontinent, the scimitar style of sword has also been influential in USA formalities. This type of sword was particularly favoured by cavalry troops.

thatched. p. 13. Roofed with tied bundles of straw, rather than tiles, corrugated iron, pan-tiles or slate. There are still thatched houses in UK, where they are a tourist attraction. Even in UK thatching is an art which is dying out.

heed. p. 17. To take notice of, to pay attention to. Also, to ‘hear and to obey’.

downs. P. 26. Undulating country, useful for farming, neither too hilly nor too flat. Apart from real estate agents and housing developments, virtually unknown term outside of South Western England, where we have Watership Down, the Cotswold Downs and much else.

blood mare. p. 27. Thoroughbred mare, used for racing, breeding and for light riding rather than for riding into battle.

base-birth. p. 36. No particular pretensions to be anybody. Usually applied to commoners or lower classes by those with pretensions to a better lineage.

peasant. p. 49. A term for poorly paid, badly educated rural workers and tenant farmers who traditionally work the land to supply produce and service to overlords like Anradin, instead of rent.

barbarian. p. 51 and subsequently. Anyone who does not fit into the ruling culture, in this case, the Calormene culture.

hangdog. p. 53. Sullen, sheepish or ashamed.

a touch of the sun. p. 55. Sunstroke, a condition better known fifty years ago, which is due to anyone being too long in the Sun without protective hats and other gear thus getting sunburned, dehydrated, feverish and really quite ill.

sherbet. p. 55. Effervescent drink or a fizzy powder dessert in UK or else an American iced dessert.

to treat. p. 57. to negotiate or haggle. Hopefully in this case the participants might come up with a treaty, a similar word.

hastilude. p. 57. A sort of medieval competition involving martial arts and lances in particular. Hasta, hastae is the Latin word for spears.

jests. p. 58. Another word for jokes.

suffer. p. 59. To put up with, or to tolerate.

blot them out, gobble them up. p. 59. ie, to eradicate, destroy or swallow them up.

oasis. p.59. A place in the middle of a desert where there is water and some vegetation.

furlong. p. 60. An old imperial measurement of distance mostly used in horse-racing. A furlong is equal to 660 feet or 220 yards, and eight furlongs are equal to an international mile. A furlong is equal to a fifth of a kilometre, or 200 metres for us Aussies who converted to metric measurements in the 1960's and 1970's.

dozen. p. 60. Another old imperial measurement of quantity, equal to 12 items.

repulses. p.60. Setbacks, defeats.

galleon. p. 61. A large, multi-decked, multi-masted and well-armed sailing ship used by European seafarers in the 16th to 18th centuries.

contrive. p. 61. To make or invent

pledge. p. 61. A commitment, promise or vow.

counsel. p. 61. Advice.

bazaars. p. 61. Marketplaces. The term is derived from Persian or Turkish (pasar), but has caught on world-wide. These days in the Middle East and elsewhere, marketplaces are generally called souks rather than bazaars.

minim. p. 61 A small coin, even in the real world. Also a rather short note in music scores.

sweetmeat sellers. p. 61. Confectioners, or sellers of lollies, toffees or candies etc. In UK, candies are called sweeties.

galley. p. 62. A pre-16th century Mediterranean predecessor to the galleon, a galley is a ship propelled by oarsmen, used for either trade or for war. As distinct from a ship's galley which is another name for the ship's kitchen.

close-fisted. p. 63. Means tight-fisted, mean, stingy, careful with money. In Arsheesh's case I'd imagined he was a bit too quick with his fists anyway.

snipe. p. 64. A game bird related to the woodcock. Snipe are wading birds like egrets, herons or ibis, but appear to be smaller waterbirds, like ducks. Thus they are to be found in wetlands and near waterways like the river surrounding Tashbaan. However worldwide they might be, they are not native to Australia.

fool p. 64. In this context, a sort of dessert which combines fruit, berries in particular, with whipped cream, sugar and possibly rose water, also used to make Turkish delight.

looking-glass. p. 66. Mirror. See also LWW.

frightful. p.67. Horrible, terrible. :-o But elsewhere in HHB 'frightfully' is used as a synonym for very, somewhat, rather or exceedingly.

beastly. p. 67. Crude and rude and probably nasty. Only humans could think of beastly jokes.

verandah. p. 68. An open-air, usually ground-floor, roofed gallery or porch which surrounds a central building, which often has railings, and which is particularly popular in Australia and New Zealand. The term is derived from Sanskrit.

true as steel. p. 71. An idiomatic metaphoric expression meaning very loyal and dependable.

mangy. p. 75. Means shabby, worn out, filthy and contemptible. The term also refers to mange, a contagious skin disease in uncared-for cats and dogs, which is spread by mites.

pretty handsomely dressed. p.77. Meaning fairly, reasonably, somewhat or rather handsomely dressed. Pretty has been a synonym for fair.

Grand Vizier. p.83. Ottoman Turkish term for the greatest minister of the Sultan or Tisroc in this case. The Grand Vizier would have absolute power of attorney and would only be dismissible by the Sultan or Tisroc, himself.

queer. p. 83. Odd, unusual or weird. See also LWW.

tittered. p. 83. Something like sniggered. Both suggest laughing in a half-suppressed, nervous, restrained and somewhat furtive sort of way.

colonnade. p. 86. A form of architecture, involving a long line of columns, often paired, joined together at roof level. Such colonnades can be part of a portico or entrance, can enclose a courtyard or peristyle, or can be free-standing.

false jade. p. 89. A description of a woman (er Susan) which strongly implies she is an unscrupulous, unfaithful and unreliable choice for someone like Rabadash to get emotionally involved with. 8-|

desist. p.90 & elsewhere. Meaning to stop, cease, halt what one is doing or to restrain oneself.

loquacious. p. 91. Talks quite a lot. Maybe too much.

circumspection. p. 92. Discretion or caution.

irrefutable. p. 92. Can't be contradicted or argued with.

sapient. p. 94. Wise and all-knowing.

apophthegms. p.95. Another word for maxim, adage, proverb or saying. A short, cryptic remark containing some generally accepted truth.

babbler. p.95. A much less polite term for loquacious (p. 91)

interminable. p.95. Something that not only is never-ending, it also feels uncomfortably like it. Like the Tisroc's reign.

inexorable. p. 96. Relentless, ruthless, merciless.

impeccable. p.97. Faultless, and without imperfections.

scullion. p.100. Male equivalent of scullery maid. Both were terms for servants who did the washing-up and the cleaning in large Medieval kitchens.

prim. p. 104. Excessively decorous, precise or proper to the point of affectation.

hot mash. p. 116. Warm bran mash seems to be quite a comfort food for a picky horse. According to the link, it is a great way to feed the horse medicines and food supplements it might need.

pretty fast. p.124. Fairly, rather or somewhat fast.

champed. p. 126. To bite or chew on noisily. To champ at the bit is to be impatient.

terrible. p. 133. Very, rather, or extremely.

morsel. p.139. A snack. A bite to eat.

commonly p. 140. Routinely.

precipice. p.144. A particularly dangerous and sheer sort of cliff.

funk. p. 146. Especially in WW2, a colloquial term to avoid, to shrink from, especially military service. Funk can also mean a bad smell. Nowadays funk is a term in music.

sortie. p. 150. Sudden issuing of a body of troops by the defenders from a strongpoint or defensive position.

hauberk. p.152. Another name for a chain mail shirt. This sort of shirt has long sleeves and reaches to mid-thigh.

estres. p. 174. the indoor layout or plan of a castle. Including its defenses.
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Jan 09, 2011 3:34 am

Excellent work, mate! There's quite a gap between p.64 and p.174. Is that by design? (or are you just busier than I?) :p
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Jan 09, 2011 5:27 pm

Here's Prince Caspian.



If someone knows the definitions for the words just below, ones for which I couldn't find any explanation, I'd be most obliged. Thanks everyone. Enjoy!

LWW
velvet p.118
'The Lion shook his mane and clapped his paws together ("Terrible paws," thought Lucy, "if he didn't know how to velvet them!")...'

Cruels p. 123, people of the Toadstools p.123, Horrors p. 138


PC
gentlemen-in-waiting p.44
'Then he called to the gentlemen-in-waiting who was standing at the far end of the terrace and said in a cold voice, "Conduct His Royal Highness to his apartments and send His Royal Highness's nurse to me AT ONCE!"'

pleasantlie p.47
'"Will your Royal Highness be pleased to open Pulverulentus Siccus at the fourth page of his Grammatical garden or the Arbour of Accidence pleasantlie open'd to Tender Wits?"'

dappled Pomely p.154
'"I'll wager my dappled Pomely he brings a challenge, not a surrender," said Glozelle.'

order-mark p.170
'"If you don't attend, Gwendolen," said the mistress, "and stop looking out of the window, I shall have to give you an order-mark."'

---------------------------------------------------------------------


OTHERWISE, BEGIN HERE:

PC - from the Lions, 1989 edition.


playboxes p.11
boxes for children's toys and personal items

knights-errant p.17
a wandering, adventurous knight - chivalrous and highly-skilled

rhododendrons p.17
evergreen shrubs or trees with pink, purple or white flowers

jiggered p.23
confounded; damned eg. "Well, I'm - I'm jiggered" (I can't explain it/don't understand).

Jolly p.25
extremely; very

Great Scott! p.25
a euphemism used to express surprise or amazement

coronets p.28
small crowns worn by nobles

carbuncles p.28
gemstones

gentlemen-in-waiting p.44
The male equivalent of a lady-in-waiting. A person of high birth, as opposed to a servant, who waits in attendance on a king or queen.

Pulverulentus Siccus p.47
Latin - meaning 'dry as dust'

Grammatical garden or the Arbour of Accidence pleasantlie open'd to Tender Wits? p.47
Arbour - something like a pergola
Accidence - the study of inflection as a grammatical device
pleasantlie - a variation on pleasantly

buskins p.48
thick-soled, laced boots or half-boots

pother p.55
commotion; uproar

venison p.55
flesh of a deer, used for food

satchel p.55
a small bag, sometimes with a shoulder strap

unhandsomely p.63
ungraciously

whirligigs p.64
merry-go-rounds or carrousels

wolds p.66
elevated tracts of open country

water-butt p.69
a large cask used to store rainwater

horny p.69
hardened, calloused hands

glen p.71
a small, narrow, secluded valley

foxgloves p.71
plants with drooping, tubular, purple or white flowers on tall spikes

rooks p.73
black European crows

entrenchments p.77
a ditch made from earth, for protection against enemy fire

Signior p.80
a conventional Italian term of address or title of respect for a man

victuals p.82
food supplies, provisions

bivouac p.84
a temporary encampment for soldiers

wind p.86
blow

pelt p.89
to hurry

seneschal p.89
an officer having full charge of domestic arrangements, ceremonies, the administration of justice, etc. in the household of a medieval prince

hauberk p.96
a long defensive shirt, usually made of mail and extending to the knees

junipers p.96
evergreen shrubs or trees, having cones that resemble dark-blue or blackish berries

jibe p.98
teasing

bally p.108
damned (euphemism for 'bloody')

bracken p.118
a cluster or thicket of large ferns

battledores p.118
light rackets for striking shuttlecocks in an ancient Indian game, not unlike badminton

lilting p.122
to sing in a light, tripping, or rhythmic manner

slanging p.124
to use abusive language

tremulous p.126
trembling

bilge p.129
nonsense, rubbish

rum p.131
problematic, difficult

grousing p.131
to grumble; complain

tottered p.133
to walk with faltering steps

tinker's p.134
beggar/wanderer (possessive)

vixens p.135
female foxes

rowans p.136
European mountain ash with bright red berries

Bromios p.137
Dionysus - the Greek god of the grape harvest, winemaking, wine, ritual madness and ecstasy, Bacchus - same as above

Bassareus p.137
a Lydian version of Dionysus

Ram p.137
Aries the Ram, constellation of stars

Tig p.137
another name for the game of 'Tag'

hothouses p.138
artificially heated greenhouses for growing fragile plants

Bacchus p.138
another name for the Greek god of the grape harvest, winemaking, wine, ritual madness and ecstasy

Silenus p.138
a forest spirit from Greek mythology. He is the oldest of the satyrs and foster father, teacher, and friend of Dionysus: often represented as a bearded old man

addled p.141
rotten

blab p.141
to be thoughtless and indiscreet

dotard p.142
an old person showing signs of mental decline

rheumatics p.142
having rheumatism

cantrips p.142
deception by sorcery

effusion p.151
fluid from escaping; bloodletting

monomachy p.152
a duel

parley p.153
an informal conference with an enemy under a truce

dappled Pomely p.154
a grey horse with white spots.

jackanapes p.155
a presumptious person; whippersnapper

infallibly p.155
to be absolutely trustworthy or sure of something

effrontery p.156
shameless or impudent boldness

dastard p.157
a mean, sneaking coward

chafed p.157
irritated, annoyed

abate p.159
reduce, remove

Silvans p.161
a mythical deity or spirit of the woods

brick p.165
a reliable, trustworthy, or helpful person

tussock p.166
a clump of growing grass

Maenads p.168
female followers of Dionysus. They were known for going into a state of frenzy during their dancing and drunkeness. They would hunt down and kill animals and people.

order-mark p.170
a mark against a student's name showing they have behaved badly, though good order-marks are also possible. If a person gets too many they are punished or, at the end of a week/month/term, they are added up, either individually or to a house, just like the marks handed out at Hogwarts.

woebegone p.176
grief-stricken

countenance p.177
visibly disconcerted; abashed

cataracts p.180
a furious rush or downpour of water

Somerset p.181
a country in South West England

canny p.183
safe to deal with

pennants p.184
long, tapering flags serving as emblems of victory
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jan 10, 2011 4:03 am

Warrior 4 Jesus wrote:Excellent work, mate! There's quite a gap between p.64 and p.174. Is that by design? (or are you just busier than I?) :p


Oops! :ymblushing: More haste less speed, I fear. I deleted a whole lot of words I should have merged with the others. Yes, I am back at work and also have to share pc facilities.

I've fixed up the HHB list, and I hope it looks better now.

Here are two terms from LWW for which I hope you won't mind my explanations.

1.
score p.170. many
A score is the old imperial term for twenty.

2.
velvet p.118
'The Lion shook his mane and clapped his paws together ("Terrible paws," thought Lucy, "if he didn't know how to velvet them!")...'

Velveting is the term for when a cat or lion keeps his claws retracted inside his paws so that nothing gets scratched. The opposite is when the cat or lion bares his claws as an offensive or defensive weapon.
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby Lilygloves » Jan 15, 2011 7:58 am

This is so helpful! There were a ton of words on the lists that I thought I knew from context clues but didn't really know the meaning of. Special thanks for the definition of "brick". The first time I read PC I wasn't sure if that was a compliment or insult, until Peter said that Trumpkin was a brick when he thought he could die. I figured most people wouldn't insult friends under the circumstances. :)
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Re: Words Modern Readers May Not Know (from the Narnia books)

Postby fireheart209 » Feb 13, 2011 2:43 pm

I assume from context that an order mark is a form of discipline. But I find it interesting that I could not find a definition for it. The only thing I got when googling the term was a facebook page for a private girls school in which there was a discussion topic entitled "funniest thing you ever got an order mark for" Obvioulsy the term is still in use. Now I'm really curious as to what type of punishment this was.
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