Emeth in Aslan's Country

C. S. Lewis, his worlds, and his faith.

Moderators: coracle, Lady Arwen

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby Dernhelm_of_Rohan » Oct 14, 2009 9:25 am

Wow, when I re-started this topic, I never expected it would get so deep! I like your point about Cornelius, 220chrisTain.
Image

Founding Keeper of the Secret Magic
User avatar
Dernhelm_of_Rohan
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 379
Joined: Aug 03, 2009
Location: Crickhollow, Buckland
Gender: Female

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby jesusiskingofkings » Oct 21, 2009 10:15 am

Well I am new to this web site but not new to this topic. I agree with narnan 1 because I think that he hit the nail right on the head in this.

Alsan (Jesus) searches our hearts. Using Shift as an example of someone who knew the truth and used it for his on sinful desires is an example of the Pharassies in Jesus' day.

Emeth is an example of those who are saved at the last minute. Its a sign of Christ's or in this case Aslans love and mercy for those who dilligently seek him. Hebrews chapter 11 speaks to this. And I have always wounderded how Emeth was allowed into Alsans country,even though he served the god Tash. But at the same time Aslan sees the heart of this warrior and that it is truely seeking Him(Aslan) even though Emeth does not realize it.

Thats my thoughts on the matter. :ymapplause:

To Narnia and the North!!!!!!!
Heaven and earh will Pass away but My words shall never pass away. Jesus, Matthew 24:35.

"When I was a child, I thought as a child, but when I became a man, I put away childish things including the thought of being gwon-up." C.S. Lewis
User avatar
jesusiskingofkings
NarniaWeb Regular
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Oct 20, 2009
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida USA.
Gender: Male

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby Dernhelm_of_Rohan » Oct 21, 2009 5:47 pm

jesusiskingofkings wrote:Emeth is an example of those who are saved at the last minute. Its a sign of Christ's or in this case Aslans love and mercy for those who dilligently seek him. Hebrews chapter 11 speaks to this. And I have always wounderded how Emeth was allowed into Alsans country,even though he served the god Tash. But at the same time Aslan sees the heart of this warrior and that it is truely seeking Him(Aslan) even though Emeth does not realize it.


Good thoughts. Maybe I've been over-thinking it. And welcome to NarniaWeb! :ymhug:
Image

Founding Keeper of the Secret Magic
User avatar
Dernhelm_of_Rohan
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 379
Joined: Aug 03, 2009
Location: Crickhollow, Buckland
Gender: Female

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby jesusiskingofkings » Oct 22, 2009 10:20 am

Dernhelm_of_Rohan wrote:
jesusiskingofkings wrote:Emeth is an example of those who are saved at the last minute. It’s a sign of Christ's or in this case Aslan's love and mercy for those who diligently seek him. Hebrews chapter 11 speaks to this. And I have always wondered how Emeth was allowed into Alsan's country, even though he served the god Tash. But at the same time Aslan sees the heart of this warrior and that it is truly seeking Him (Aslan) even though Emeth does not realize it.


Good thoughts. Maybe I've been over-thinking it. And welcome to NarniaWeb! :ymhug:


You know we all do. We over complicate things so much that it takes a scholar to come in and sort things out. Which will only confuse things even more:-\.
Emeth is I believe an example of what the Apostle Paul tells us in his letter to the Romans. Romans chapter 2 verse12-16; [i]"All those who sinned without the law will also perish without the law, and all those who sinned under the law will be judged by the law. For the hearers of the law are not righteous before God, but the doers of the law will be declared righteous. So, when Gentiles, who do not have the law, instinctively do what the law demands, they are a law to themselves even though they do not have the law. They show that the work of the law is written on their hearts. Their consciences testify in support of this, and their competing thoughts either accuse of excuse them on the day when God judges what people have done in secret, according to my gospel through Christ Jesus."[/i]

Paul tells us the answer and I think that C.S. Lewis was through the conversation between Aslan and Emeth attempting to portray this message. Now, the only problem is this, The Calormens in a way can represent the Muslim world, and the Narnians represent the Jewish and Christian people. To say that a Muslim or a Hindu or Buddhist etc.... Can devoutly and truthfully follow his or her own religion and still be seeking Christ can mean two things.

One, that C.S. Lewis believes in universalism or that He believes in Calvinism. I think that it’s the latter. I think that C.S. Lewis uses an extreme case here to show the sovereignty of God or in this case Aslan. It’s God that chooses us and not the other way around. Unconditional Election. I also think is at work in this book. Remember the Aslan separates the Narnians and all creatures one on the right and the other on the left. This is taken from Matthew 25 when Jesus will separate the Sheep from the Goats.
So Alsan would not have allowed Emeth in had He not wanted Him in. Period. Aslan’s sovereignty. Is the ultimate topic that needs to be discussed?

Well that’s all for now.

God Bless, and........

To Narnia and the North!!!!!!!
Heaven and earh will Pass away but My words shall never pass away. Jesus, Matthew 24:35.

"When I was a child, I thought as a child, but when I became a man, I put away childish things including the thought of being gwon-up." C.S. Lewis
User avatar
jesusiskingofkings
NarniaWeb Regular
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Oct 20, 2009
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida USA.
Gender: Male

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby Pattertwigs Pal » Oct 22, 2009 4:06 pm

jesusiskingofkings wrote: Now, the only problem is this, The Calormens in a way can represent the Muslim world, and the Narnians represent the Jewish and Christian people. To say that a Muslim or a Hindu or Buddhist etc.... Can devoutly and truthfully follow his or her own religion and still be seeking Christ can mean two things.

The Calormen religion is very different from the Muslim religion. For one thing they have more than one god and Muslims have only one God. I think the Calormen religion is more like the ancient religions that the Israelites would have come across in the Old Testament.

jesusiskingofkings wrote:One, that C.S. Lewis believes in universalism or that He believes in Calvinism. I think that it’s the latter. I think that C.S. Lewis uses an extreme case here to show the sovereignty of God or in this case Aslan. It’s God that chooses us and not the other way around. Unconditional Election. I also think is at work in this book. Remember the Aslan separates the Narnians and all creatures one on the right and the other on the left. This is taken from Matthew 25 when Jesus will separate the Sheep from the Goats.
So Alsan would not have allowed Emeth in had He not wanted Him in. Period. Aslan’s sovereignty.

I’m not sure that those are the only two choices. From what I’ve heard Dr. Ransom say on another thread, Lewis didn’t agree with Calvinism (or at least his perception of Calvinism). I agree with the part about God choosing us and that it is similar to the Sheep and Goats parable. I also agree that Aslan wouldn’t have allowed Emeth to advance into his country if he didn’t want him.
Image
Silver Chair Reading Group
NW sister to Movie Aristotle & daughter of the King
User avatar
Pattertwigs Pal
Moderator
Cookie Queen of NarniaWeb
 
Posts: 5188
Joined: May 16, 2009
Location: U.S.A.
Gender: Female

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby jesusiskingofkings » Oct 23, 2009 7:54 am

I may need to clarify something here, so as not to cause any confusion here. I believe that God wants all in His Kingdom, however He is a gentlemen, and He will not force Himself onto someone. Yet in 2Peter 3:9 it says "The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is long-suffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance."

I am not sure of what C.S. Lewis thought or believed concerning Calvinism or the topic concerning Man's responsibility and God's Sovereignty. I think that it’s both personally. I think that the scripture teaches both very clearly. In, Joshua it says "Choose you this day whom you will serve, but as for me and my house we will serve the Lord" And yet Jesus says in John that we do not chose Him, but he chooses us.

How I think this relates to Emeth, is that Emeth did not chose at all to serve, worship, or even acknowledge that Aslan is Supreme until he(Emeth) met Aslan. So, therefore Aslan sought Emeth out. Now once Emeth came in contact with Aslan, we see the real heart of Emeth. Are heart that was repentive and achnowleged the fact that he was not worthy of Aslans grace, or mercy. And yet Aslan sees his heart of humility and extends His love and mercy out to Him, even though he did not deserve it. If that’s not unconditional election, then I do not know what it is.

God Bless, and to Narnia and the North!!!!!!!
Heaven and earh will Pass away but My words shall never pass away. Jesus, Matthew 24:35.

"When I was a child, I thought as a child, but when I became a man, I put away childish things including the thought of being gwon-up." C.S. Lewis
User avatar
jesusiskingofkings
NarniaWeb Regular
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Oct 20, 2009
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida USA.
Gender: Male

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby EveningStar » Oct 23, 2009 9:27 am

I think 90 percent of the contents of this thread may be mere semantics IF (and I qualify with "IF") my idea is correct. Bear with me.

It is said in Revelation that Jesus has a name for everyone that is known only to him which he will write on a white stone and give to us. (Yes, I know the history behind the image of the white stone, how they were used as souvenirs for travellers, and it is not relevant to the point I'm going to make, thanks.) To cut to the chase, God identifies us by what we are, not by what our new parents hope we'll be or whom our new parents wish to honour. In other words everyone has a "REAL" name, something that jibes well with Lewis' views on Plato you see expressed openly in LWW. A real name sums up who and what you are and how you got there. A real name is part of you, not a serial number.

We must believe on the name of Jesus. Fine, but how do you BELIEVE ON A NAME? Does knowing my name is John make you any more likely to help me if you found me lying shot in an alley? Does it make my "Good morning" any more sincere...or any less? Jesus' name is not a password, it's a symbol that represents a person. Jesus wants you to believe in that person, not the symbol. The symbol is only holy when you use it to represent the person, just as a Bible is only the word of God when it is read. And to be honest, do you think that for billions of years Jesus as a member of the Trinity was either totally anonymous or had a Hebrew name eons before Hebrew existed? His name isn't Jesus, Fred, Quasimoto or Sally Ann Myrtlebank. Jesus is the stage name under which he was incarnate and dwelt among men. Like the Cross, it is a symbol. Also like the cross, it's not a magic talisman in and of itself.

It is quite possible that the notion of goodness and perfection that Emeth sought was by its very good and perfect nature the "NAME" of Jesus in God's sense of what a name constitutes. There is a term for this, it's called the Doctrine of Anonymous Christianity. That is when you have Jesus without the J. E. S. U. S.

The only way you'll ever be fully comfortable with this explanation is if you put it in some sort of logical context. We have sinned. Emeth knew he sinned. We have fallen short of the Glory of God. Emeth knew he was unworthy to be in the presence of God. We need forgiveness to be with God. Emeth knew that also. We must receive a freely given gift of salvation. Now think carefully, if you had a box with a red button marked "eternal damnation" and a green button marked "eternal salvation" and you absolutely believed it worked, which button would you (and 99 percent of the rest of humanity) press? You'd be a fool to push the red button. Every child molester and drug dealer in the bad part of town knows that. Damnation is not our friend. Jesus wanted every human being to hear and accept the message that just by being alive human beings are in danger of damnation and that if they accept God's freewill gift of salvation and repent of their sins they will be saved. All of which Emeth understood.

What it all comes down to is that he spelled Jesus with a T instead of a J. That, my friends, is Anonymous Christianity.

You may not agree. But trust me, this isn't something I formulated one cold January day waiting for the Number 3 bus. You really ought to dig into this, and not just for the purpose of proving me wrong. What exactly did Jesus expect from people? What exactly was he wanting to do? Did he fill in the Password and Repeat Password blanks on the Lamb's Forum of Life with J-E-S-U-S just to make sure little kids in grass huts would go to hell when they died? Or is believing on the name of Jesus something more than a password to eternity? I respectfully submit that belief in words is not the path to salvation. Following Jesus is, whether you spell it with a J or a T.

And friends, it works both ways. There are some wolves in sheeps clothing that worship Tash spelled with a J. Beware them and fall not into their snares.
EveningStar - Mage Scribe
Narnia Home
http://narniahome.com
User avatar
EveningStar
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 218
Joined: Jan 16, 2006
Location: Byron on Wells

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby 220chrisTian » Oct 23, 2009 3:48 pm

jesusiskingofkings wrote:I think that C.S. Lewis uses an extreme case here to show the sovereignty of God or in this case Aslan. It’s God that chooses us and not the other way around. Unconditional Election. I also think is at work in this book. Remember the Aslan separates the Narnians and all creatures one on the right and the other on the left. This is taken from Matthew 25 when Jesus will separate the Sheep from the Goats. So Alsan would not have allowed Emeth in had He not wanted Him in. Period. Aslan’s sovereignty.
...
Man's responsibility and God's Sovereignty: I think that it’s both personally. I think that the scripture teaches both very clearly. In, Joshua it says "Choose you this day whom you will serve, but as for me and my house we will serve the Lord" And yet Jesus says in John that we do not chose Him, but he chooses us.

How I think this relates to Emeth, is that Emeth did not chose at all to serve, worship, or even acknowledge that Aslan is Supreme until he (Emeth) met Aslan. So, therefore Aslan sought Emeth out. Now once Emeth came in contact with Aslan, we see the real heart of Emeth. A heart that was repentive and achnowleged the fact that he was not worthy of Aslans grace, or mercy. And yet Aslan sees his heart of humility and extends His love and mercy out to Him, even though he did not deserve it. If that’s not unconditional election, then I do not know what it is.
Along with Pattertwig, I heartily agree. I think the Bible has abundant examples of both man's responsibility/choice and God's sovereignty--working together. And for everyone in this thread the verses jesusisking referred to are Joshua 24:15 and John 15:16. :)

EveningStar: I'm not sure how to respond to your post about the significance of the name of Jesus. :-\ How do we believe on a name? Well, we believe Jesus Christ died to save us from our sin. We believe He is the savior of our souls. Jesus is Greek [and Joshua is Hebrew] for "savior." And this is what Jesus is, is he not? Jesus Christ = mighty/anointed to save ... literally! I think faith in a name = faith in a person's words, deeds, character, faithfulness, etc. :)

10/25 EDIT
Check out my Youtube playlist "Name of Jesus." And I heard "Something happens" at church this morning! :D Click here for the lyrics. The point? Heaven takes notice when anyone mentions the name of Jesus! Anyone! There is power and authority in the name of Jesus! :)
/EDIT
User avatar
220chrisTian
NarniaWeb Guru
 
Posts: 2181
Joined: Mar 23, 2009
Location: U.S.
Gender: Female

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby Watziznehm » Oct 28, 2009 11:53 am

The story below illustrates how I view Emeth. I have no idea whether or not it coincides with how Lewis thought but that I like to think of it this way.

Once upon a time there was a dog named Ralf. Now, Ralf was raised by cats and consequentially believed that he was a cat. He was always told to hate dogs but as he had never seen one he really didn't know what he was hating.

One day while he was carrying on a very peculiar habit of sniffing everything in sight he herd a strange noise. "woof woof... woof woof". "What in the world is that" he thought to himself. It was at this moment that something clicked inside of him for he wanted, nay, loved that sound. He thought to himself, that has got to be the most awesome cat ever. So, he started searching for the sound. He had exhausted himself of looking for "it" and was flopped down in a cool place to catch his second wind when saw a strange looking animal walking towards him. He had never seen another of his race before but instinct told him what it was. "It's a dog" he thought. Oh my goodness if only I could be one he thought in remorse. The dog came right up to him and said "hello there, a bit tired are you". "Ye-ye-ye-yes" stammered Ralf. "Hey what's with you, you look like you have just seen a ghost" said she, for a she it was. "Your a dog are you not" inquired Ralf still not recovered from his stupefaction. "Of course I'm a dog" laughed the other dog. Why would I be anything else? "Well if you are a dog I pray you not to hate me for I am a cat" said Ralf in misery. Seeing you I wish with all my heart that I could have been a dog. At this the other dog laughed harder than ever and, in a few minutes, when she had recovered her self said "but you are a dog". "What, that can't be, for I have always been called a cat" said Ralf in great puzzlement. For the first time the other dog began to look serious and said "follow me". Ralf followed her still stupefied and utterly puzzled as to what the other dog was leading him to. He was even more puzzled when she led him to a small pool. The other dog told him to look into the pool. Now, it so happened that the sunlight fell at just the right angle that if anyone looked into the pool they would be able to see their own reflection. When Ralf looked in he got the shock of his life for not only could he see the other dog reflected in the pool but another creature almost identical to her. Ralf had never seen his own reflection before but he had brains enough to guess what the other "creature" was. It was himself. "Hooray" he shouted, I am a dog.

The End.

Emeth is like Ralf. Ralf was a dog but it didn't dawn on him until he had met a dog and was able to see his own reflection against hers. I think the same thing goes for Emeth.

I also compare Emeth to some words that G.K. Chesterton wrote.

G.K. Chesterton wrote:For if this book is a joke it is a joke on me. I am the man who with the utmost daring discovered what had been discovered before. If there is and element of farce in what follows, the farce is at my own expense; for this book explains how I fancied I was the first to set foot in Brighton and then found I was the last. It recounts my elephantine adventures in pursuit of the obvious. No one can think my case more ludicrous than myself; no reader can accuse me here of trying to make a fool of him: I am the fool of this story, and no rebel shall hurl me from my throne. I freely confess all the idiotic ambitions of the end of the nineteenth century. I did, like all other solemn little boys, try to be in advance of the age. Like them I tried to be ten minutes in advance of the truth. And I found that I was eighteen hundred years behind it. I did strain my voice with a painfully exaggeration in uttering my truths. And I was punished in the fittest and funniest way, for I have kept my truths: but I have discovered, not that they were not truths, but simply that they were not mine. When I fancied that I stood alone I was really in the ridiculous position of being backed by all of Christendom. It may be heaven forgave me, that I did try to be original; but I only succeeded in inventing all by myself an inferior copy of the existing traditions of civilized religion. The man from the yacht thought he was the first to find England; I thought I was the first to find Europe. I did try to found a heresy of my own; and when I had put the last touches to it, I discovered that it was orthodoxy.


In this Chesterton is explaining how he left Christianity to discover a heresy of his own. After all was said and done however, he accidentally discovered Christian orthodoxy to be the values he had held in the first place.

Emeth is kind of the opposite of that. He set out on a journey on what he thought was orthodoxy. However, When he finally gets all perspectives and is able to look at his reflection he sees that what he thought was heresy was actually his orthodoxy.

If you have any doubts about Emeth's orthodoxy then maybe you need to look at his reflection as compared to the other Calormen's. The other Calormen's wanted to deal with the Narnian's by trickery and ill dealings but Emeth would have rather met them in an honest fight. Hmmm, that sounds like Narnian to me. The other Calormen's were scared to meet there god but Emeth wasn't scared, nay, was over joyed to meet his god. Hmmm, that sounds Narnian to me as well.

It is now that I must rest my case. I not only believe Emeth went further up an further up and further in but that he will always love the god that was originally to him a heresy but which he discovered in the end to be his orthodoxy.
Image
Sig by greenleaf23.
User avatar
Watziznehm
NarniaWeb Junkie
 
Posts: 893
Joined: Oct 25, 2009
Location: Canada
Gender: Male

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby EveningStar » Oct 28, 2009 12:51 pm

One of you said it was "too bad that Lewis isn't around to ask what he meant by the whole Emeth episode."

While I'm sorry he's dead, it's not sad that he's not around to ask. We can't ask Jesus if stem cell research is murder or medicine either. And that's ok because Jesus wanted people to search their feelings. That's the only reason why he asks people to pray for things, not because you're telling him something you don't know but because you're going through the process of evaluating what's important to you while you're in his presence.

If we could ask Lewis what he meant, it would divide the board into two distinct camps...those who dismiss it and say he was a fool and those who accept it and say he was a prophet. As it is, people discuss it together, which is a good thing.
EveningStar - Mage Scribe
Narnia Home
http://narniahome.com
User avatar
EveningStar
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 218
Joined: Jan 16, 2006
Location: Byron on Wells

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby 220chrisTian » Oct 28, 2009 1:10 pm

Watziznehm: great example! :ymapplause: I especially like this part:
Emeth is like Ralf. Ralf was a dog but it didn't dawn on him until he had met a dog and was able to see his own reflection against hers.
It reminds me of what Emeth himself says: "And this is the marvel of marvels, that he called me Beloved, me who am but as a dog--" [LB ch 15]. :) God made us for more, did He not? We are made in His image. But sometimes we forget that because of our sinful, corrupted natures. And in our sin we resemble Satan rather than God. :( But there's hope! Christ is the image of God. And He became a man to save us from sin, to give us the more abundant life [John 10:10]. This is our purpose: to be holy as He is holy, to be transformed into the image of Christ. "For whom He did foreknow, He also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the firstborn among many brethren" [Romans 8:29]. How does this happen? "But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord" [2 Corinthians 3:18]. :)
User avatar
220chrisTian
NarniaWeb Guru
 
Posts: 2181
Joined: Mar 23, 2009
Location: U.S.
Gender: Female

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby jesusiskingofkings » Oct 30, 2009 9:15 am

If have to give a short comment about the name of Christ only because I have not had a chance to respond as of yet.

I think that you have point their, Evening Star, however I am having a hard time accepting that any other name other than the ones given to Jesus in the word of God can actually save some one from their sins. Obviously it’s the blood of Christ and His death on the Cross and His Resurrection that allows the opportunity to accept Jesus as Savior.

The other names that the bible gives Jesus describe who He is, His attributes and His position as being Lord and King of the whole universe.

Co 1:18 says" And Hem is the head of the body, the church; He is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything He might have the supremacy."

And in Ephesians 3:14-15 says “For this reason I bow my knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, from whom the whole families in Heaven and Earth is names."

And in Luke Chapter 1
31 And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS.
32 He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David:
33 And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end.

I think that the no other name other than the name of Christ can save anyone of their sins.

Peter testifies to this in Acts Chapter 2
38 Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.

There is no name in Heaven or under Heaven or in earth or under the Earth in which man can be saved. That is what the word of God teaches.

Now Aslan is the name the Lewis gives him in Narnia. And in voyage Alsan tells Edmond that he must learn to know Him by that name in his own world.

But remember that these books are fiction, not real. The messages and themes are real, but the characters even Aslan is a make believe character in the end, so we can not take anything that is said in the Narnia books as being totally authoritative. Should we apply the themes to our lives? Yes. The themes are love, forgiveness, repentance, humility etc... Just to name a few. However the Word of God aught to be our source of authority concerning doctrine.

Well that’s all for now, to Narnia and the North!!!!!!!
Heaven and earh will Pass away but My words shall never pass away. Jesus, Matthew 24:35.

"When I was a child, I thought as a child, but when I became a man, I put away childish things including the thought of being gwon-up." C.S. Lewis
User avatar
jesusiskingofkings
NarniaWeb Regular
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Oct 20, 2009
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida USA.
Gender: Male

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby Watziznehm » Oct 30, 2009 11:39 am

Thanks 220ChrisTian.

Great verses you got there. I'm reminded again of how AWSOME our God is!
Image
Sig by greenleaf23.
User avatar
Watziznehm
NarniaWeb Junkie
 
Posts: 893
Joined: Oct 25, 2009
Location: Canada
Gender: Male

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby jesusiskingofkings » Nov 01, 2009 11:01 am

Watziznehm wrote:Thanks 220ChrisTian.

Great verses you got there. I'm reminded again of how AWSOME our God is!




Yes Our God is Awesome, one of my most favorite passages is Revelation 15 here it is in its fullness:

Revelation Chapter 15
1 And I saw another sign in heaven, great and marvelous, seven angels having the seven last plagues; for in them is filled up the wrath of God.
2 And I saw as it were a sea of glass mingled with fire: and them that had gotten the victory over the beast, and over his image, and over his mark, and over the number of his name, stand on the sea of glass, having the harps of God.
3 And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, great and marvelous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints.
4 Who shall not fear thee, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy: for all nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy judgments are made manifest.
5 And after that I looked, and, behold, the temple of the tabernacle of the testimony in heaven was opened:
6 And the seven angels came out of the temple, having the seven plagues, clothed in pure and white linen, and having their breasts girded with golden girdles.
7 And one of the four beasts gave unto the seven angels seven golden vials full of the wrath of God, who liveth for ever and ever.
8 And the temple was filled with smoke from the glory of God, and from his power; and no man was able to enter into the temple, till the seven plagues of the seven angels were fulfilled.

Is this not the power of God? I think that this chapter really demonstrates how awesome, holy, just and powerful He really is, and how small and weak we really are.

I cannot wait to see Him in His fullness.

God Bless and to Narnia and the North!!!!!!!
Heaven and earh will Pass away but My words shall never pass away. Jesus, Matthew 24:35.

"When I was a child, I thought as a child, but when I became a man, I put away childish things including the thought of being gwon-up." C.S. Lewis
User avatar
jesusiskingofkings
NarniaWeb Regular
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Oct 20, 2009
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida USA.
Gender: Male

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby Dernhelm_of_Rohan » Nov 05, 2009 6:57 pm

jesusiskingofkings wrote:But remember that these books are fiction, not real. The messages and themes are real, but the characters even Aslan is a make believe character in the end, so we can not take anything that is said in the Narnia books as being totally authoritative. Should we apply the themes to our lives? Yes. The themes are love, forgiveness, repentance, humility etc... Just to name a few. However the Word of God [ought] to be our source of authority concerning doctrine.


I heartily agree. Sometimes we get so caught up in finding the hidden meaning of something, we miss the point: Lewis wrote a fictional series, partly for enjoyment, and partly to teach us something. Emeth doesn't necessarily need to represent a non-believer; the topic just opens the door for speculation. But, definitely, let's not over-think this. Learned my lesson on that! lol

However...
I'm the last person to object to Bible verses, and I love that chapter, jesusiskingofkings... but this is getting a little off-topic. I don't want to cause the mods any trouble, so let's stick to the thread's title topic.
Image

Founding Keeper of the Secret Magic
User avatar
Dernhelm_of_Rohan
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 379
Joined: Aug 03, 2009
Location: Crickhollow, Buckland
Gender: Female

Re: Emeth in Aslan's Country

Postby 220chrisTian » Nov 06, 2009 1:43 pm

Dernhelm wrote:I'm the last person to object to Bible verses, and I love that chapter, jesusiskingofkings... but this is getting a little off-topic. I don't want to cause the mods any trouble, so let's stick to the thread's title topic.
Good point. Thanks. :)

I'm working on a blog called "He called me 'Beloved.'" It starts with Emeth! ;)
In C. S. Lewis’ The Last Battle, when Emeth tells the Kings and Queens of Narnia about his meeting Aslan, he says, “This is the marvel of marvels, that he called me, Beloved, me who am but as a dog–” (157). Does this sound familiar?

Who is the true “beloved”? Jesus Christ. After He’s baptized in the Jordan River, a voice from heaven says, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased” (Matthew 3:17; cf Mark 1:11, Luke 3:22). The same thing happens at Jesus’ transfiguration (see Matthew 17:5, Mark 9:7, Luke 9:35, 2 Peter 1:17). And when God saves and calls us, “He hath made us accepted in the beloved,” Jesus Christ (Ephesians 1:6).

But who are we without Christ? We’re dogs! When David was fleeing from Saul, he asked him, “After whom is the king of Israel come out? After whom dost thou pursue? After a dead dog, after a flea” (1 Samuel 24:14). David felt like nothing. Mephibosheth, the lame son of Jonathan, senses the same about himself. After King David brings him to his house for Jonathan’s sake, Mephibosheth asks, “What is thy servant, that thou shouldest look upon such a dead dog as I am?” (2 Samuel 9:8) When the Syro-Phoenician woman came to Jesus to ask Him to heal her daughter of a demon, Jesus told her, “It is not meet to take the children’s bread and to cast it to dogs” (Matthew 15:26; cf Mark 7:27). This sounds like an insult, but it isn’t. Yes, in the minds of the Jews, Gentiles were dogs. But Jesus is testing this woman’s faith. And she tells Him, “Truth, Lord, yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters’ table” (Matthew 15:27; cf Mark 7:28).

Why do these people feel like they’re worthless? It’s because dogs are unclean. So to call someone else a dog was a reproach, while to call oneself a dog signified humiliation (Easton par. 1). According to Easton’s Bible Dictionary, “Persecutors are called ‘dogs’ (Ps. 22:16). Hazael's words, ‘Thy servant which is but a dog’ (2 Kings 8:13), are spoken in mock humility – impossible that one so contemptible as he should attain to such power” (par. 1). And to be eaten, or to have one’s blood licked up, by dogs – instead of a proper burial – showed contempt (1 Kings 14:11, 21:19, 23, 22:38). God would not allow anyone to bring “the price of a dog into the” tabernacle to fulfill a vow (Deuteronomy 23:18). In the New Testament, Paul used the term “dogs” to describe false apostles (Philippians 3:2). And these “dogs,” like “sorcerers, and whoremongers, and murderers, and idolaters, and” liars, are not allowed into heaven (Revelation 22:15). That is how unclean the animal is in the sight of God. That is the reproachful, humiliating nature of the epithet. And this is how God sees us in our spiritual nakedness. In His sight, we’re unclean dogs – too sinful to approach the throne. We deserve death.

Angels called Daniel “greatly beloved” (9:23, 10:11, 19). But was he special in any way? No! Song of Solomon celebrates the marriage between King Solomon and his bride. “Solomon,” from shalom, means “peaceful.” The bride is called a Shulamite, which also means “peaceful” (from shalam – to be safe). It’s a pet name, meaning essentially the king gave the bride his name. Here’s the interesting part. Throughout this book, the bride calls the bridegroom “beloved” (1:13-14, 2:8-10, 16-17, 4:16, 5:2, 4-6, 8-10, 16, 6:1-3, 7:9-11, 8:5, 14). When Solomon was born, Nathan the prophet gave him another name, Jedidiah (2 Samuel 12:25). And it means “beloved of the Lord” (see Nehemiah 13:26). What does this mean? Allegorically, Jesus Christ is the Bridegroom, “beloved of the [Father].” And in Christ we are sons and daughters of God. We are called by His name. We are “beloved” (Song of Solomon 5:1).

Here’s another interesting bit. The Jews used to read Song of Solomon every Passover, to signify the relationship between God and Israel. What was the fulfillment of Passover? The death of Jesus Christ on a cross. It is only through the cross of Christ that we are “accepted in the beloved” (Ephesians 1:6). And it is only through the cross that we are called “beloved” sons and daughters of God. Truly we can say, “This is the marvel of marvels, that he called me, Beloved, me who am but as a dog” (157).


So, your thoughts?
User avatar
220chrisTian
NarniaWeb Guru
 
Posts: 2181
Joined: Mar 23, 2009
Location: U.S.
Gender: Female

PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest