Weird Words

The community lounge for non-Narnian discussions.

Moderators: stargazer, johobbit

Re: Weird Words

Postby Kalta79 » Oct 02, 2019 1:14 pm

I don't remember what it is off the top of my head anymore, but there's actually a word to describe a neighbor who's house is on fire.

I wonder about words all the time. And some make me laugh, like "taco". It just sounds funny to me.
User avatar
Kalta79
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 193
Joined: Oct 25, 2017
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby Grandmama » Oct 02, 2019 3:47 pm

waggawerewolf27 wrote:
Have you ever seen anyone play music, using handbells, either alone or in concert with others? It is quite fascinating & enjoyable to listen to music played this way. We used to have church bells playing music as well as pealing in joy for weddings, & tolling for funerals but not so often these days, or only briefly. A church in London donated its church bells to the City of Perth in 1988, as a Carillon & there is also one in Lake Burley Griffin opposite Parliament House in Canberra. You'd hear much tintinnabulation there. :-$


Yes, I have been privileged to hear a handbell choir several years ago. Very nice.
"I suppose the sewing machine's too heavy to bring?. . . I can't abide the thought of that Witch fiddling with it. . ."
User avatar
Grandmama
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Jan 29, 2018
Location: Minnesota
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Oct 02, 2019 5:03 pm

Kalta79 wrote: And some make me laugh, like "taco". It just sounds funny to me.


Sorry, the idea of tacos just make me hungry to eat one :D . Beautiful, crispy taco shell with grated cheese, a bit of tomato or avocado & shredded lettuce, with salsa or guacamole. Possibly with cold roast chicken, beans or other meat filling. What a lovely range of ideas for a summer main meal. B-) Probably ideal if one has coeliac disease, if it doesn't involve wheat flour.

I believe that the idea of tacos come somewhere from either Texas way or Mexico, originally. So it is not necessarily an abbreviation of something else, unlike similar words you'd find in Australia, where abbreviations are down to a fine art.
A tinny is not just "short" for a (used to be tin) can of nice cold refreshing ale, pilsener, or lager, to be drunk with one's summer lunch, if equally nice cold "soft drinks" or soda don't appeal. It can also refer to a small light aluminium rowing boat, possibly with an outboard motor on the back, useful for going fishing or swimming on a Sunday arvo (afternoon). Unfortunately, many inland rivers have run dry now. :(

I'm not sure that what you might call a "pick-up truck" is the same as what we call a utility truck, shortened to a utility, which has a 2 or more seated cabin with a fenced open tray on the back. They are often used by tradies (tradesmen), farmers, sportsmen, couriers & the like. In Australia, such a utility truck is always further abbreviated to a ute. I understand that native Americans can sometimes be of Ute heritage as well. :-\ It isn't the same thing at all. Maybe I should take a dekko (look) at some of these words... Aren't dialects & idioms fun!
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 8382
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby stargazer » Oct 03, 2019 10:03 pm

Handbell choirs seemed to be quite popular some years back, and a church I attended had a good one. I enjoyed when they played for the offertory or special music.

wagga, I think our 'pickup trucks' are probably the same (or very similar) to your 'utes.' (Googling a US brand, say Ford F150, will give you an idea of what is in use here).

It's not exactly a weird word, but there is a phenomenon in which familiar words begin to look strange if they're seen too often in a short time. Among other things, it can be called semantic satiation. For example, many years ago I worked in a vegetable packing plant over the summer, loading cases of frozen peas onto pallets. After seeing the word "peas" several thousand times each night, it eventually looked like a really weird word. ;))
But all night, Aslan and the Moon gazed upon each other with joyful and unblinking eyes.
User avatar
stargazer
Moderator
 
Posts: 21929
Joined: Mar 28, 2004
Location: by a campfire

Re: Weird Words

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Oct 07, 2019 2:56 pm

Maybe you are right, Stargazer. ;) Sleep in heavenly peas, perhaps? Having a peas full dinner?

stargazer wrote:wagga, I think our 'pickup trucks' are probably the same (or very similar) to your 'utes.' (Googling a US brand, say Ford F150, will give you an idea of what is in use here).


Yes I see what you mean. Your pick-up trucks tend to be a bit more "squarish" than do ours though.

We used to have fun with making sentences out of the names of commonly used herbs such as Rosemary, Basil, Sage, Parsley, Marjoram, Dill, and the like. Unfortunately I grew older & found out that I didn't have the Thyme. :D
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 8382
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby Grandmama » Oct 15, 2019 5:39 pm

After watching the latest episode of The Great British Baking Show, my new weird word is "Kardemummabullar" which is a type of Swedish bun and they have a festival on October 4th to celebrate them. :) They looked very tasty--I would love to be in Sweden next October and try one. (if only!)
"I suppose the sewing machine's too heavy to bring?. . . I can't abide the thought of that Witch fiddling with it. . ."
User avatar
Grandmama
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Jan 29, 2018
Location: Minnesota
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby Kalta79 » Nov 04, 2019 7:29 pm

I think my mother just got checked out a DVD of that show from the library. :)
User avatar
Kalta79
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 193
Joined: Oct 25, 2017
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby Grandmama » Nov 08, 2019 5:19 pm

Kalta79 wrote:I think my mother just got checked out a DVD of that show from the library. :)

It's one of my favorite shows on Netflix.

Last night we were watching an episode of "Father Brown" on Netflix and this word came up: "pulchritudinous", which means beautiful. When I see that word, I don't think "beautiful"!!
"I suppose the sewing machine's too heavy to bring?. . . I can't abide the thought of that Witch fiddling with it. . ."
User avatar
Grandmama
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Jan 29, 2018
Location: Minnesota
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby aileth » Nov 08, 2019 10:43 pm

Grandmama wrote:Last night we were watching an episode of "Father Brown" on Netflix and this word came up: "pulchritudinous", which means beautiful. When I see that word, I don't think "beautiful"!!

No, in my mind it goes with pusillanimous (lacking courage) and lachrymose (tearful) and maybe even with lassitude (indolent indifference). Definitely not "beautiful!"
Now my days are swifter than a post: they flee away ... my days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle
Image
User avatar
aileth
Moderator
Peripatetic powder-room sub
 
Posts: 774
Joined: Jan 02, 2014
Location: Beautiful British Columbia
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Nov 09, 2019 6:54 pm

Grandmama wrote:Last night we were watching an episode of "Father Brown" on Netflix and this word came up: "pulchritudinous", which means beautiful. When I see that word, I don't think "beautiful"!!


No, I think of Latin masses, law & medical terms & much more, including Dr Cornelius' Pulverulentus Siccus' grammar book. Especially as it was Father Brown you were watching, not Mrs Brown's boys. :D "Pulchritudious", also makes me think of pasta puttanesco, ie a quick & easy pasta meal involving a sauce with anchovies, capers, olives, & tomatoes, not to mention garlic & chilli. The Latin term for a beautiful girl is puella pulchra, as opposed to a naughty girl (puella grata), so there you go. :D But then a tasty sauce might make a beautiful meal, regardless of whether it is in good taste to describe the "puella" who originally made it, as always "grata" as well as "pulchra". ;;)

We have a saying in Australia which goes something like this: "he/she has Buckleys Chance", ie little or no chance. Something like Hobson's Choice elsewhere, I've heard. In our case Buckley's Chance, Buckleys or none, or simply Buckley's, might refer to an escaped convict who turned up at the founding of Melbourne in Victoria, having lived with an aboriginal tribe since his escape. Do others have, or know of, similar expressions like Buckley's chance?
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 8382
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Weird Words

Postby aileth » Nov 09, 2019 11:06 pm

Reminds me of the (probably apocryphal) story of an ESL speaker, who complained:
You English are so strange! When there is a bare possibility that something will happen, you say it is a slim chance. But when there is no hope at all, you say, "Fat chance!"
Now my days are swifter than a post: they flee away ... my days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle
Image
User avatar
aileth
Moderator
Peripatetic powder-room sub
 
Posts: 774
Joined: Jan 02, 2014
Location: Beautiful British Columbia
Gender: Female

Previous

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests