The Fascinating World of Personality Types

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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby The Rose-Tree Dryad » Jun 10, 2014 10:51 pm

The quiz that helped point Ithie in the direction of INTP is this one; it can be very helpful with getting you on the right track. It gives you the top three types that fit you the best according to your input, and it also gives you an idea of what the order of your cognitive functions might be.

Just don't assume that its first choice is correct! The test told me that I was most likely an ENFJ the last time I took it. Nope, decidedly a hermit over here. :P

Ithilwen wrote:What I find most surprising is the "P" aspect. When I read a description of what it means to be a J, I identify with all of it. When I read about what it means to be a P, I don't identify with any of it. Yet, the INTP description fits me quite well. :-?


I think this article has the answers you're looking for. (Make sure to read both pages.) It appears that when you're talking about introverted perceivers and judgers, judging and perceiving becomes much more nuanced than just asking yourself, "Do I like to plan ahead, or do I prefer to be spontaneous?"

I wish I'd known about this stuff when I was stuck between INFJ and INFP a couple years ago. ;))
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby Arwenel » Jun 10, 2014 11:48 pm

Is there a personality type that corresponds to being really bad at getting back to answering people?

Honestly, the only thing i'm sure i am is Introverted as opposed to Extroverted. The more i take these tests, the more confused i get.

Going by that page you linked to, i think i might be a J. I oscillate between putting stuff off indefinitely and jumping in and doing something because if i don't do it right away i'm worried i won't do it at all.
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby The Rose-Tree Dryad » Jun 11, 2014 1:24 am

Arwenel wrote:Is there a personality type that corresponds to being really bad at getting back to answering people?


I'm afraid that's pretty widespread across the MBTI spectrum... I certainly seem to have that trait as well. ;))

Arwenel wrote:Honestly, the only thing i'm sure i am is Introverted as opposed to Extroverted. The more i take these tests, the more confused i get.

Going by that page you linked to, i think i might be a J. I oscillate between putting stuff off indefinitely and jumping in and doing something because if i don't do it right away i'm worried i won't do it at all.


That sounds quite a lot like me, and I'm a Judger. If you're positive that you are an introvert and if you think that you're probably a J as well, then that narrows down the field by seventy-five percent! Your possible personality types are:

INTJ
INFJ
ISFJ
ISTJ

All of those profiles are quite lengthy, but I think Personality Junkie is really useful for digging deep into the individual types and fleshing them out. If I were you, I'd start by taking a look at the general overview at the top of each page. If some of them seem like they resonate with you more than the others, then read further on those. :)

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask because I like researching this stuff. ;))
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby Arwenel » Jun 11, 2014 10:56 pm

I don't say this with any degree of certainty, but going by that, i'd say i'm INFJ.
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby The Rose-Tree Dryad » Jun 12, 2014 10:38 am

Arwenel wrote:I don't say this with any degree of certainty, but going by that, i'd say i'm INFJ.


I'd be more than happy to welcome you into the club, though I usually hope for people to have an "Aha! This description describes me so well, it's almost creepy" kind of reaction when finding the right type. :-?

Or it could be you're just extremely skeptical after testing as so many different types... I wouldn't blame you, either. ;))

Taking J off the table for a moment, have you looked at INTP? This is the basic Personality Page description and this is the Personality Junkie page if you want to read more in-depth. Looking at some of your older posts on this thread, you were sometimes testing as ISTP and INFJ, and INTPs can often test as INFJ, so it's worth a shot.

Sorry that I keep throwing links at you. ;))
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby Arwenel » Jun 14, 2014 1:06 am

I suspect that by this point, i've tested as everything beginning with an I. Some of the descriptions have fit better than others.

INTP seems more accurate, at least according to the Personality Junkie page --

They generally avoid direct eye contact, as though the gaze of their interlocutor may somehow harm them or render them incapable of thinking or communicating.


Eye contact is awkward for me, mostly because i'm unsure of how much is appropriate.

This may explain why many INTPs often take interest in writing, which provides an excellent forum for expressing themselves more fully and precisely.


Precision!! Yes, communicating my exact meaning is very important to me, and a major frustration -- though i don't always find writing to be satisfyingly precise, either.

As discussed in my post on INTP careers, INTPs can struggle to find satisfying jobs within the system and are often happier functioning as freelancers or entrepreneurs.


Much as i dislike my retail job and enjoy the idea of working on my own terms without someone watching me, i'm not really sure that would work out well ...

Many will struggle with nihilism and relativism, worried that they may never find absolute truth. It can therefore take INTPs a great deal of time, even well into their thirties, to discern what they believe about the world and about themselves, let alone figure out what they should be doing.


Hmm ... I've certainly done a lot of thinking about worldviews and absolute truth, and there was a time where i found nihilism intriguing (though not believable).

And i definitely haven't figured out myself or what i want to do yet.

Inwardly, INTPs are highly self-disciplined, working to effectively manage their thoughts and their lives. The disciplined nature of their Ti compels INTPs to frame many things as a goal or challenge. These challenges may be physical (e.g., trying to achieve an ideal state of health or fitness), intellectual, practical, psychoemotional (e.g., becoming self-actualized), or later in their development, interpersonal (e.g., “perfecting” a relationship or becoming a skilled lover). In order to succeed in these personal challenges, INTPs are apt to impose rules on themselves. However, because of the wayward influence of their auxiliary Ne, they commonly end up breaking or sabotaging them.


I was dubious until i got to those last two sentences. I hardly ever meet the goals i set for myself.

INTPs often find it easier to identify inconsistencies or logical shortcomings—to assert what is not true—than to identify and confidently assert what is true. They can quickly locate inconsistencies or logical shortcomings in a given theory or argument. They excel when it comes to identifying exceptions or imagining scenarios in which the proposed explanation could breakdown. Due to their sensitivity to theoretical exceptions, they can be quick to throw theories and start from scratch.


I do sometimes seem to play the role of hole-poker. Mostly in the realm of fiction.

When orating, INTPs may not always seem to “have a point” as they haphazardly drift from one idea to the next. Even ideas that seem inwardly logical and sensible INTPs may suddenly sound incoherent when they attempt to convey them through their Ne.


Yeah, conveying ideas can be ... hard.\

In its receptive role, Ne prompts INTPs to gather information. Ne does not merely gather sensory information as Se does. Rather, it goes beyond or looks behind sense data, allowing INTPs to discern otherwise hidden patterns, possibilities, and potentials. Their Ne is constantly scanning for relationships or patterns within a pool of facts, ideas or experiences. INTPs commonly use this receptive side of their Ne in activities such as reading, researching, and conversation. They enjoy asking questions that allow them to gain insight or knowledge from others, making INTPs good facilitators of conversation.


This i'm not sure about at all.

Like other NPs, INTPs often have a love-hate relationship with their Ne. They love the fact that it helps them remain open-minded and grasp the bigger picture. But living with Ne also has its challenges. For one, it can make it difficult for INTPs to arrive at firm conclusions or make important decisions. It often seems that at the very moment they are feeling good about a given conclusion or decision, their Ne steps in and causes them to start doubting it again. This has obvious implications for INTPs who are trying to find their niche in the world. This can leave them feeling discouraged and restless, worried that they may never find what they are looking for. They may feel frustrated by their seeming lack of progress toward anything substantial. The fact is that INTPs desperately want to produce something of lasting worth or value, but they also want to ensure they get it right. They don’t want to leave any stone unturned before arriving at a conclusion. While INTPs typically enjoy this quest for truth, there comes a point when they begin to feel the pressures of life impinging on them. Questions about careers and relationships loom large as they enter their late twenties and thirties. This can be frustrating to INTPs as they feel like life is requiring them to make decisions long before they are ready. As is true of all IN types, they feel that life would be far better if they weren’t forced to consider practical concerns.


Yes, especially that bit about lasting worth or value.

Types with Si in their functional stack, including INTPs, tend to eat a fairly routine or consistent diet, “eating to live” rather than “living to eat.” Si types are not only conservative with regard to their diet, but with respect to the material world in general. They tend to be savers rather than spenders, seeing excessive material consumption as unnecessary, or perhaps even immoral. Like other Si types, INTPs also have a diminished need for novel physical pleasures, lavish surroundings, or material comforts. They are minimalists to the core, relatively unconcerned with their physical surroundings.


This is ... sort of true? There are material things that i like and i will spend money on them (video games, books, etc.), but i do save some money and i definitely don't get as much out of food as other people seem to.

In a group setting, INTPs, like ISTPs, want everyone to feel included and treated with fairness and respect. While not as warm and effusive as FJ types, INTPs are concerned with others’ feelings and try to avoid hurting or offending them. Like FJ types, INTPs do what it takes to maintain a basic level of harmony in their immediate circumstances. Unlike FJs, however, they are generally slow to go out of their way to help others (at least not in a direct, hands-on way). Most INTPs forgo community service and do not invest extensive time or energy into helping others. This is particularly true when under stress. If burdened by too many demands and without sufficient time to themselves, INTPs' willingness to help others is one of the first things to go.


I was inclined to say i was an F because of that first part; whatever i may think of something or someone, i am concerned primarily with making sure they won't hate me or get mad by what i say.

And yeah. My mom has been suggesting i get involved in volunteer work as a means of getting out and meeting people, and while i don't object to the idea, i haven't been as proactive in doing something about it as i should be.

INTPs may also avoid extraverting their judgments by way of their Fe because of concerns about their ability to effectively articulate them, fearing that they will be perceived as less intelligent than they really are. Hence, their reluctance to self-express relates not only to a concern for others, but also to their own fears, insecurities, and ego. It can therefore take a great deal of courage for INTPs to assert themselves, particularly when discussing controversial or otherwise uncomfortable issues.


Self-confidence? What's that?

Because of their difficulty with direct self-expression, INTPs are prone to making sudden executive decisions without any prior communication. Others may be left feeling incredulous as to why the INTP had not thought to discuss the issue with them first. INTPs may also exhibit passive-aggressive forms of behavior, such as intentionally staying late at the office to eschew or resist domestic expectations.


I've never solved a problem by hiding from it, but it hasn't exactly been for want of trying.

Like FJs, INTPs like the idea of teaching others. INTPs strive to discover knowledge or wisdom they can use to enlighten the world. But as we’ve seen, INTPs can struggle when it comes to directly expressing their judgments. They are more comfortable exchanging ideas by way of their auxiliary Ne than they are in delivering Fe monologues. INTPs can also become impatient with those who are slow to understand or embrace their ideas.They often expect others to learn as quickly and independently as they do. For these reasons, INTPs are often ill-suited for teaching (with the possible exception of college/university professorship) and better off sharing their insights less directly, such as through writing.


I love the idea of explaining things -- storylines, concepts, philosophies, etc. -- but i've never relished the idea of teaching. I'd like to think i'm a bit more tolerant of people disagreeing than this implies, but it is hard for me to see how someone could disagree. Not because i'm right necessarily, but because the one answer is so obvious to me i don't understand how the other perspective could be believable.

Fe involves making connections between one’s own emotions and those of others. When a successful connection occurs, it results in a sense of validation, of being valued and understood. While INTPs can do at fair job at reading others’ emotions and are cognitively aware of the appropriate social response, they often do not “feel” what others are feeling. Despite this difficulty in connecting with others on a feeling level, their Fe still desires the same sense of affirmation and validation that FJs readily receive when engaging with people. This need for affirmation can be seen as a motivating force behind INTPs’ desire for achievement. It is why many INTPs score high as Enneagram Threes (3) and display certain narcissistic tendencies. Personally, I never understood my desire to write for a popular audience (rather than an academic one) until I recognized that my Fe was pushing for widespread affirmation.


Yes. I think even if i discovered the cure for cancer or something, unless someone outright told me i did a good job, i would feel like a worthless waste of space.

And i am not at all convinced i'm any good at deciphering other people's emotions, which is why i wasn't convinced i was an F.

Because INTPs, wittingly or not, rely on others for affirmation, they may often feel they cannot live without at least one other person in their lives. At other times, they can feel incredibly independent (Ti). Especially when their work is going well, they may feel they don’t really need other people. If they manage to completely isolate themselves from others, they will soon begin to feel that something important is missing from their lives. This prompts them to reinitiate contact with others, at least until they feel compelled to assert their independence again. This cycle of alternating between needing and devaluing others is common among INTPs and narcissists alike.


While this is fairly accurate ... i don't think i'm a narcissist. I hope i'm not a narcissist.

Despite the inferior position of their Fe, INTPs are not emotionless robots. Rather, as is typically the case with the inferior, there is an all-or-nothing character to their Fe. INTPs’ emotions seem to have a mind of their own, coming and going as they please. Consequently, INTPs often feel awkward or inept in emotional situations, knowing that they cannot readily summon the situationally-appropriate emotions.


Yeah, i don't think my emotions like me very much.

While INTPs struggle to directly summon or contact their emotions, they can readily override or detach from them, almost functioning as though they didn’t exist. Consequently, INTPs may not consciously struggle with the same degree of guilt, regret, or shame as other types. Others may be surprised how quickly INTPs can seemingly resume “business as usual” after what most would consider tragic or traumatic circumstances.


Yeeah.

Okay, looks like that was a bit more accurate than i thought. ;)) Sorry for the massive post.
I have heard there are troubles of more than one kind
Some come from above, some come from behind
But I've bought a big bat, I'm all ready you see
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby Ithilwen » Jun 14, 2014 2:24 am

Arwenel wrote:Okay, looks like that was a bit more accurate than i thought. ;))

Looks like you've found your type. And it is a pleasure to meet a fellow INTP. B-) I've heard we are rather rare, you know.

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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby The Rose-Tree Dryad » Jun 14, 2014 1:01 pm

Arwenel wrote:Okay, looks like that was a bit more accurate than i thought. ;)) Sorry for the massive post.


No worries; I'm just glad you've found your type! Hooray! I had a hunch INTP might be just the thing; glad that it panned out for you. :D

In other news, Disney did a blog post a few months ago where they assigned one of their characters to each MBTI type. I think they're right about some of them and may be off-base on others.

ISFJ for Cinderella and INFP for Belle make a lot of sense to me. Elsa doesn't seem like a good fit for INTJ, though. The more I think about it, the more I'm inclined to believe that she's an ISTJ. (For an INTJ in Disney, I think I'd point to someone like Basil from The Great Mouse Detective, but I need to see that film again.) Not so sure about Flynn Rider being an ESTP, either; deep down, he might be an ENTP. I will say that Peter Pan is the poster child for ESFP, though. As for Mary Poppins, ESFJ seems quite accurate. ESTJ looks like a great fit for Maximus, too.

I'm not really sure if Pocahontas is an INFJ. I'd been leaning towards INFP rather than INFJ because I thought her quickness to smackdown the prejudices of John Smith (as seen in the beginning of "Colors of the Wind") indicated Fi rather than Fe, but it could be a classic case of an INFJ speaking up because it's something they really care about. (We tend to pick our battles.) I probably need to watch the movie again.

Not sure about some of the others; it's been ages since I've seen some of these films. Need to have a Disney movie marathon soon. ;))
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby IloveFauns » Jun 15, 2014 5:14 am

I am actually doing a psychology unit next semester that has some focus on personality. I will share any interesting knowledge than. I took psych in upper highschool to. I remember OCEAN- the 5 personality types and something about that being the most accepted personality test(though that may be my memories being jumbled).

I remember taking a number of different personality test in my year 11 psych class. I always had trouble answering the questions. Sometimes none of the responses fitted what I would actually do in that situation, always had to go fr the one I was likely to do(even that option I was unlikely to do). Anyway personality tests/types should be taken with grain of salt(i think I jumbled that saying up). Though something I do remember is that personality is relatively stable by the age of 15/16 for most traits.
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby The Rose-Tree Dryad » Jun 16, 2014 3:45 pm

IloveFauns wrote:I am actually doing a psychology unit next semester that has some focus on personality. I will share any interesting knowledge than.


That sounds like fun! I'd definitely be interested in hearing any interesting info you learn. :)

IloveFauns wrote:I took psych in upper highschool to. I remember OCEAN- the 5 personality types and something about that being the most accepted personality test(though that may be my memories being jumbled).


MBTI definitely seems to be more famous from what I can tell, but OCEAN might be more accepted among academic circles. It seems like it might do a better job pinpointing potential weaknesses or even emotional problems unique to the test taker, even more so than the rather generalized MBTI, so it definitely seems like something employers would be especially interested in.

IloveFauns wrote:I remember taking a number of different personality test in my year 11 psych class. I always had trouble answering the questions. Sometimes none of the responses fitted what I would actually do in that situation, always had to go fr the one I was likely to do(even that option I was unlikely to do). Anyway personality tests/types should be taken with grain of salt(i think I jumbled that saying up).


I've about gotten to the point where I think that tests are basically useless for definitively typing anyone. ;))

They can definitely point you in the right direction, and I was lucky to get INFJ the first time I took the MBTI test that I linked on the first page. The cognitive function test that I linked at the top of this page is probably one of the better ones for giving you more information to go on, though I can't promise very much accuracy, either.

I'm learning that you can't really be sure of your type until you've looked into the cognitive functions and how they interact with one another. Meyers-Briggs is a complicated typology, but hey, it makes it all the more interesting.

(For me, anyway. ;)))

IloveFauns wrote:Though something I do remember is that personality is relatively stable by the age of 15/16 for most traits.


I've heard that as well, though I've also looked at personality types in children, so it's hard to say. (For instance, some of the descriptions I've found for supposedly INFJ children sound a lot like me when I was little.) I'm not really sure about when a personality type definitively appears or takes root. :-?
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby IloveFauns » Jun 16, 2014 6:32 pm

I am actually taking two psych units next semester(considering I did switch to psych this is what I should be doing but I also have to do two other boring inter-professional units). The second unit focuses on mental illness and I think sorting data.

I guess it differs between person to person when personality becomes stable. Also other factors may affect personality after that age of 15/16, such as major life crisis/event or drug taking. I know many people on the methadone program suffer from personality disorders due to past drug abuse. One of the patient's mother told me how much her son had changed since he started abusing drugs. It is rather sad seeing these people suffering from extreme forms of bipolar and schizoprenia.
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby Narnian_Badger » Jun 24, 2014 1:36 pm

Oooooh typing. O.O Typing typing typing. One of my favourite activities; I could click and clack away at the keyboard all day, never mind carpal tunnel. Yes yes, typing is--

Ooooh. That kind of typing. Also one of my favourite activites. :D

...Hey there. Quite definitive INTJ here; from letters to functions I could hardly get more INTJ if I tried. I love my type and embrace its awesomeness; I also appreciate that the more I know about my type the more I can understand and work on my weaknesses. Knowing how types work is also very useful to me, as if I know someone else's type, I can understand all the more how they think and how I should best interact with them.

So. All that said. Typing.

The best advice I can give someone who's struggling with trying to identify their type is don't trust the test. Tests, especially the online version, do occasionally get people right (particularly Ts). But you have to remember that, ideally, MBTI typing is about how you think, and most tests have to guess at that based on how you act.

If you're really interested in figuring your type, don't take a test. Learn. Use tests you've taken as a starting point, and read up on that type. Does it really match you, or you trying to match it? And most importantly, read about the functions. As an INTJ, mine are Ni-Te-Fi-Se: viewing the world under that particular hierarchy perfectly matches the way I think. So, if you're really curious, check out functions. They're confusing as all get out at first, but they help a lot once you get a handle on them.
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby The Rose-Tree Dryad » Jun 24, 2014 4:45 pm

IloveFauns wrote:I guess it differs between person to person when personality becomes stable. Also other factors may affect personality after that age of 15/16, such as major life crisis/event or drug taking. I know many people on the methadone program suffer from personality disorders due to past drug abuse. One of the patient's mother told me how much her son had changed since he started abusing drugs. It is rather sad seeing these people suffering from extreme forms of bipolar and schizoprenia.


Wow, that's very interesting and very sad. :( I wonder if the core personality type is actually changing, or if it's more of a case of "shadowing" another type, as people are wont to do when under stress. Probably depends on the situation and the brain chemistry.

Narnian_Badger wrote:Oooooh typing. O.O Typing typing typing. One of my favourite activities; I could click and clack away at the keyboard all day, never mind carpal tunnel. Yes yes, typing is--

Ooooh. That kind of typing. Also one of my favourite activites. :D


Lol! ;)) So good to see you on the forum again! :ymhug:

Amen to everything you said about cognitive functions. I have started studying them a lot during the past few months and it's given me a much more in-depth understanding of how MBTI works and how all of the different personality types actually operate. At the end of the day, MBTI is about how your brain is wired, and that doesn't necessarily translate to certain behavioral patterns. The tests are a start, but they're very flawed and frequently give incorrect results.

So yes, if you're really interested in learning your MBTI personality type, definitely look into the cognitive functions and find descriptions that outline the personality with the functions in mind. I've found Personality Junkie to be a really helpful site when it comes to merging basic descriptions with cognitive function expertise.

Also, ditto to MBTI knowledge being helpful for interacting with other people! I think one of my favorite aspects of being relatively MBTI-savvy is being able to say, "This person isn't just trying to annoy me or offend me; it's more that their brain is wired differently than mine." And then I can research the whys and hows of that until the cows come home if I want. It's great; it can give you a much deeper understanding of people. :)
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby Narnian_Badger » Jun 24, 2014 7:12 pm

The Rose-Tree Dryad wrote:Lol! ;)) So good to see you on the forum again! :ymhug:

You as well! 'Tis good to be back. :D

Rosah wrote:Also, ditto to MBTI knowledge being helpful for interacting with other people! I think one of my favorite aspects of being relatively MBTI-savvy is being able to say, "This person isn't just trying to annoy me or offend me; it's more that their brain is wired differently than mine." And then I can research the whys and hows of that until the cows come home if I want. It's great; it can give you a much deeper understanding of people. :)

Personality Junkie is indeed great. :D And so much this quote. It's helped me with a couple of relationships in particular, as I want to be all "But the thing is RIGHT THERE and it's so obvious!" but then I have to step back and remember that they're thinking about it in a totally different way, and it might help me, too, to stop and think about things their way.

I also find it really fun to try typing fictional characters. For example, one of the clearest examples of an INTJ in fiction, to my mind, is Bean from the Ender's Game series. It was really nice to read a book about an INTJ that wasn't evil. :P

(...Also, Rosah, I've discovered I tend to gravitate towards/really like INFJs. Congrats on continuing that pattern. ^.^)
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby The Rose-Tree Dryad » Jun 24, 2014 10:10 pm

Badgah wrote:It's helped me with a couple of relationships in particular, as I want to be all "But the thing is RIGHT THERE and it's so obvious!" but then I have to step back and remember that they're thinking about it in a totally different way, and it might help me, too, to stop and think about things their way.


Same here! It's honestly hard to quantify just how helpful it's been for me. I know some people are tempted to think that MBTI is just a weird hobby, but it's really so much more than that.

Badgah wrote:I also find it really fun to try typing fictional characters. For example, one of the clearest examples of an INTJ in fiction, to my mind, is Bean from the Ender's Game series. It was really nice to read a book about an INTJ that wasn't evil. :P


Lol, I get tired of that as well. :)) I think INTJs are one of the most frequently misunderstood types; everybody just wants to lump y'all in the evil mastermind category. Mastermind, yes. Evil... not usually. ;)) I really need to read Ender's Game! I've been meaning to pick it up for years.

I love trying to type fictional characters, too. It's a really fun challenge! Lately I've been attempting to type Jadis and the Lady of the Green Kirtle. (I've had some discussions about the "Are they the same person?" debate recently, so I became curious from an MBTI standpoint.) I'm currently thinking that Jadis is probably an ENTJ, whereas the LotGK seems to be an ENFJ. It's hard to type psychopaths accurately, though. ;))

Badgah wrote:(...Also, Rosah, I've discovered I tend to gravitate towards/really like INFJs. Congrats on continuing that pattern. ^.^)


Aww! :ymhug: I tend to gravitate towards INTJs, too. My brother is one and we've always gotten along remarkably well. (I used to chalk it up to superior parenting or something, but I'm starting to think that we lucked out in the personality type department as well. ;))) We think in a lot of the same (weird :P) ways, and I can always count on him for really interesting conversation. Yay for dominant Ni! B-)
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Re: The Fascinating World of Personality Types

Postby IloveFauns » Jun 24, 2014 11:40 pm

@Rose the job was a good exposer to the world of mental health. It made me want to help these people where as most people think they are a loss to society and just shove them to one side. These people are on a constant rotation of jail, programs, low paying jobs.

@Badgah Us intj's are all for world domination.......haha
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