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Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby Shadowlander » Jun 25, 2014 3:47 pm

California is one of the more heavily regulated states and so it doesn't surprise me that there's not as many to be found there, although out in the more rural areas I suspect there would be more owners. I think I read the highest gun ownership rate is Alaska owing to the frontier life that state offers to its denizens, and where firearms are as much a necessity for daily living as is water. The largest pocket of gun owners I personally know seem to be concentrated in Pennsylvania, but much of the southeast is fairly open to them too. Some states are a bit more restrictive than others, but I imagine the rule of thumb is that the more rural the area the more likely it is that you'll find a gun owner of some type. I suspect most of those are probably shotguns or rifles at that.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby Puddleglum » Jun 25, 2014 7:58 pm

While I will also try to stay out of the political side of this, I must bring up the historical aspect of the argument, at least as it is made in the U.S.
the 2nd Amendment freedom to bear arms was, and is seen as a deterrent to an overreaching government. The founding fathers of our nation saw the abuses of such a government before, and during our war of independance, and saw the possibility of our own country's leadership doing the same. So they wanted the citizenry, both then, and now to also have the power to deter said abuse.
That being said, there are those who abuse these rights, and those who act irresponsibly. But that can be said for almost everything, be it drinking alchohol, or driving reclessly. Even the Freedom of Speech has been abused to such a degree by some as to cause personal harm to others.

Shadowlander. Good luck with the collecting. Not about to try such a quest myself, looking mostly for hunting. But, I do have a reproduction Kentucky for the Rendezvous I attend.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jun 30, 2014 6:15 pm

Shadowlander wrote:...suffice it to say that hunting is not the sole purpose of gun ownership. I purchased my first rifle last month, an old Mosin-Nagant 91/30 WW2 Soviet battle rifle. My goal is to eventually get at least one of each firearm used in that war by each nation (and a few WW1 weapons too, and if I can swing it I'd love a Kentucky long rifle as well), but most collectors never achieve that level and end up with a dozen at the most
.

Even in Australia, people can still get licensed to use rifles etc if they have a recognised occupational use for them, or for activities like hunting or sport. I don't know about collecting antique guns, though there are plenty in museums. The whole thrust of our licensing laws is to stop access to military-style weapons unless one is actually in the military or in the police, where such guns are meant to be kept. And to ensure that all legal weapons are properly stored, in club houses for example, away from domestic premises, if possible, adequately locked up when not in use, and to deny access to unlicensed others.

I'd imagine that there is still some hunting going on, mainly of feral animals, like the foxes and rabbits introduced by 19th century "landed gentry" wannabes. Or feral pigs, cats, dogs, goats etc. Years ago, a neighbour whose occupation was as a prison officer was killed on a feral pig hunting trip. His daughter was carrying his gun the wrong way, and tripped over a fallen tree or branch. The gun discharged as she fell, and the ricocheting bullet went right into him as he turned to see what had happened.

Now back to liquorice. We not only have Darrell Lea, a well-known firm based in Kogarah, but also Ricci, an Ingleburn firm. But Ricci is only available through Woolworths, which also supply their own brand of liquorice, as does Coles, the other major grocery retailer. I don't know how you would get liquorice from Australia, and the sources you would have to go through. All that importing and exporting is over my head, I fear. Ricci's address is 3 Brooks Road, Ingleburn. NSW 2565. Their online address is www.riccilicorice.com.au & their telephone no. for further enquiries is 1300 669 405. The area code for Australia is 61+
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby Shadowlander » Jun 30, 2014 8:19 pm

wagga wrote:Years ago, a neighbour whose occupation was as a prison officer was killed on a feral pig hunting trip. His daughter was carrying his gun the wrong way, and tripped over a fallen tree or branch. The gun discharged as she fell, and the ricocheting bullet went right into him as he turned to see what had happened.


It is sad to see anyone get killed, be it by a firearm or a drunk driver or plane crash or the thousand other ways it may happen. A firearm is a very dangerous thing when in untrained hands and that's where accidents of this type happen the most. When my daughter hits around age 6 I plan on getting her her own rifle. Not much really, probably a dinky little .22 Crickett rifle (they even sell them in pink ;)) ). And I plan on teaching her to respect the weapon. It's not a toy, and whle one has great enjoyment in firing one it's not something to be lackadaisical about when handling it. It's a thing that if you don't respect it it can turn around and hurt or even kill you, like electricity or a car. It is a huge responsibility to own and carry one and she'll be taught to understand that and adhere to safety rules.

As for licorice the stuff they make over here is very much inferior to what you folks have over there. About the best I've found was Jelly Belly brand licorice jelly beans. The Aussie-style licorice is catching on though and now I can go into a store and find it on the shelves in the candy section, though I'm not so sure about getting it unless it's made in Australia. You people seem to have a very good grasp on making delicious licorice and I kind of think of the stuff they make here as "fake" licorice :))
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby IloveFauns » Jun 30, 2014 8:56 pm

I personally don't like the idea of giving a child a gun under any(well almost any) circumstances. Also the idea they are marketing them to children by making them pink/colourful, makes me feel somewhat sick. I remember gruen planet showing an advertisement of this(I am trying to find the segment but I am unable to). Anyway on a slightly lighter note I assume a cricket bat would be the weapon of choice for an Australian being burgled. Though for me, some of the text books I have would knock anyone out. Imagine the the head line " A thief knocked out my a chemistry text book".

Talking about Darrell lee. I use to love the little jars of "pillow" shaped lollies one could get. Not sure if they are still available. I have a memory of my mother winning a Darrell lee vulture, and buying a supply which included some nice tasting peanut type chocolate.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jul 01, 2014 5:09 am

No, I don't like the idea of people having unrestricted access to guns. It is too easy for people to lose their tempers and arguments can get ferociously out of control if guns are kept in the house. It is bad enough we have drive-by shootings, due to bikies and other "he-men" types who don't get licences, who have some unusual religious beliefs, and who are often part of our underworld of "well-known business men and colourful racing identities", as these organised crime figures have been euphemistically called.

Oh I do realise that people can behave badly without guns. We've had a spate of people dying or being seriously maimed due to being "king hit" which is now called "coward punches". And then there was the woman I used to know who wanted to hit the man with whom she was arguing, with a large pumpkin. But knives, fists and even pumpkins are more likely to injure one or two people rather than a whole group of people.

Years ago I used to drive a Hillman Minx. These vehicles aren't around any more. Some mornings when it was slow to start I could use a crank handle to start this vehicle. But I was not as au fait as I should have been with the bits and pieces that make up a car's innards.

When I first met my husband he took me up to the other side of the Blue Mountains at Bathurst, to a bee-keeping meeting, taking my car to give it a good run. But I didn't trust him then, so when he wanted me to take a different way to the way I wanted to go, I threatened that if his way turned out to be dodgy, I'd clobber him with the crankshaft. (Meaning the crank handle). Yes, that was my weapon of choice to defend myself. Not that it was necessary that time, since he was so helpless with laughter, he wouldn't have been particularly dangerous to anyone. #:-s :)) He also said that by the time I dismantled the car to get the crankshaft he'd be long gone.

I have a memory of my mother winning a Darrell lee vulture, and buying a supply which included some nice tasting peanut type chocolate.


I vaguely remember those little jars with nice glossy brightly coloured pillow shaped lollies. But I don't know who made them. And now you mention them, I rather fancy them. :(( I remember Columbines with the slightly shiny turquoise and pink wrappings in a long package with harlequins & ballerinas on them. And we still can get fantales, wrapped in yellow and blue twists of paper with short biographies of film stars on them. I think I remember the chocolate peanut sweets. But I did see bags of Rock lea road, and Peanut Brittle (Peanuts in toffee) at the local chemist the last time I was there. Unfortunately they didn't have those lovely slabs of golden butterscotch, sort of like chocolate, that you can break into pieces.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby IloveFauns » Jul 01, 2014 5:37 am

Ha that is a funny story. I once threatened to hit a guy with a shoe if he didn't stop bothering my sister. That is as threatening as I get.

I found them, by google searching "coloured bottled pillow lollies" and they are made my Darrell lea. They are just like rock candy(i think they are rock candy)....... I just thought the only time I say candy instead of lollies is for candy cane and rock candy. I know a lot of Americans think the word "lolly" is weird. A class mate(newly arrived) asked me "why the heck do you people call candy after a car". Haha she thought people had been say lorry.

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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby Shadowlander » Jul 02, 2014 3:36 am

I do understand both of your feelings towards firearm ownership. Believe me, I do. If someone from another country bragged about their heritage of juggling live hand grenades or intentionally getting snakebit repeatedly as a show of faith (there are places in the backwoods of the US where this is actually the case :-o ) I'd think they'd have lost their minds. I don't want to try and convince you of anything and was really only attempting to sort of show you our mindset on the subject. It's very much a cultural thing here, along with love of foods that are bad for you and affection for automobiles and it is difficult to explain that kind of thing to someone who's not used to that kind of mindset. I can only ask to please trust us as most of us are not crazy people. ;))

Speaking of food I've read up on this meatpie which is you guys' national dish of sorts and I was wondering if there was a recipe to make some here. It sounds almost like a chicken/beef/turkey pot pie but without the goopiness. ;))
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby IloveFauns » Jul 02, 2014 4:11 am

Yeah I can see it is a different culture. It has been passed down the generations. Though not as dangerous, you guys likely wonder why we add "ie" to the end of stuff or sometimes an o(I remember people use to call student services "studo's". I am not one for doing this regularly. I think it is funny we call motor cycle gangs, "Bikie" gangs. Makes them seem less threatening I guess.

I know the other states of Australia are not into big cars like the Americans, but Western Australia surely is. Off roading (four wheel driving) is a huge thing here. My mum gets annoyed when parents drive there kids t school in these huge vehicles(taking up two parking spots).

As for the food. I couldn't stomach some of the American dishes I have heard of. Most of the Australian "national" dishes are not to my tastes either. I much rather go Asian, Indian or Italian. Though pavlovas using coconut essence(rather than vanilla) are the best.

Ha I am the last Australian you want to ask about meat pies. The last time I had one was likely around 2001(about the only time I had one). I have had hardly any red meat since 2006( I have had to on occasions when I don't want to offend someone's cooking or what ever). I hope waggawerwolf can help.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jul 04, 2014 5:03 am

@ ILF & Shadowlander. I did go through my recipe books, but found the best one was this Donna Hay recipe. Another good one was this Reader's Digest recipe. Some others were weird since they include ingredients like a teaspoon of vegemite. No wonder IlF doesn't care for meat pies. :p

The Donna Hay recipe is the best one because of the conversions she put into the recipe, since we use Celsius in Australia for oven temperatures, quantities etc. 180 degrees Celsius is 350 degrees Fahrenheit it seems.

I don't like minced meat much, though I use it for speed and prefer it as lean as possible. I usually prefer chunks of meat with as much gristle and fat sliced off as I can. I can then dust with either cornflour or plain flour before cooking which I do with a basin lined with glad wrap or a plastic bag containing the flour in which I can roll the meat around to cover it lightly.

Meat pies can be varied. They don't have to be beef. Chicken, bacon and fish, even vegetables on their own, can be done in a pie, though you would have to change the stock and sauces to match what you are cooking. Chopped tomatoes, frozen peas, corn, and carrots, sliced mushrooms and capsicum strips are all ingredients that can be combined with meat fillings to give a more tasty pie.

Curried powder or the various Indian curry pastes can substitute for worcestershire sauce, and tomato sauce, our equivalent of tomato ketchup for a curry pie. Shadowlander, do they have Worcestershire sauce in USA?

ILF wrote: I think it is funny we call motor cycle gangs, "Bikie" gangs. Makes them seem less threatening I guess.


On the contrary, it at least distinguishes them from motor cycle riders who may be perfectly innocent people who prefer a motor bike as a cheap and reliable means of transport. Not that I like motor bikes, myself. Saturday afternoons were usually the times when teenaged boys, having dodged helping Mum & Dad with the morning shopping rush, would finish off their tinkering with engine innards, clean themselves up - hopefully - and then, about 4pm, they would very noisily ride these monstrosities around the emptied streets, in an attempt to impress the girls. Or more likely, other petrolheads.

Some blokes can be just as offensive with automobiles also, except these ones were called surfies when they took along surfboards strapped to their vans (called sin bins) and station wagons. They are the ones whose descendants still take off noisily to show off when in the vicinity of a girl learning to drive.

I can agree that bikes may be of real interest, eg BSA, Harley Davidson, Isuzu, Kawasaki, etc. There are also motor bikes so laid back their riders look like they are lying down to ride them. And don't forget the trikes and the quad bikes. But even in the past, bike riders could earn themselves with this noisy showing off a lot of names like larrikins, louts, hoons and, originally, bodgies, thereby making life harder for themselves.

Shadowlander wrote:It's very much a cultural thing here


Of course it is a cultural thing for you, and many people in USA would agree, I'm sure. But it depends on exactly where you are what sort of cultural "thing" one has in mind, I guess. Our modern day bikie is often someone who is so extremely far gone that he joins bikie clubs where the uniform is black leather, tattoos, metal studs, biker helmets, beards etc. Some "milder" ones may do good in the community for PR. Until the powers that be find out what they have been actually up to under that "innocent" exterior. They may be Hell's Angels, Comancheros, Bandidos or Gypsy whatevers. Or they may have other more local names, like Brothers 4 Life or the Bra boys.

The trouble is, that these types of bikies are more into vendettas against each other, rioting, causing violent incidents, like drive-by shootings, drug pushing, gun-running, and in some of these vendettas and in the localities where they occur, the words "jihad" or "MEOC" (Middle Eastern Outreach Council - a police unit) may also ring a good deal more than a bell. All cultural, I guess, but it is sometimes hard to separate cultural and religious beliefs in places where forced marriages of girls younger than 12, segregating men and women, and other strange ideas like routinely breaking the law are considered okay.

This is another cultural thing I must do. :D Happy 4th July from Down Under.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby King_Erlian » Jul 04, 2014 5:52 am

And from ol' Blighty also. I have a question to the Americans: what time of day on 4th July do you do your firework displays? At this time of year there are not many hours of darkness in the northern hemisphere, so do you wait until it's dark (after younger children's bedtimes) or do you have them in the daytime - and if so, how good do they look?

The main firework night in Britain is Guy Fawkes' Night, November 5th, by which time it's dark by about 5.30 pm, so it's not a problem having a firework display against a night sky and then getting the kids off to bed at their normal time.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby IloveFauns » Jul 04, 2014 7:15 am

@Waggawerewolf Vegemite??? that is strange. A meat pie with Vegemite in it would be my worst nightmare(since I dislike both). Well not my worst nightmare but you know what I mean.

Indeed most motor cyclists are innocent people. I had a weird encounter with a motor cyclists group(I won't call them a gang because they were not committing any crimes), but a group of 4 of them came through my checkout when I worked at IGA and bought a nerd lolly rope and a pear. It was a little strange, but it is a great story.

Never ever drive past building sites during work hours when you are on your L's. I stopped going to the same driving instructor because he thought it was funny to make me drive pass them several times in the same less. With them shouting at me each time I passed. I couldn't drive a different way, because he likely would of used the breaks on his side and told me off for driving the wrong way.
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby SnowAngel » Jul 04, 2014 8:50 am

Shadowlander wrote:I think I read the highest gun ownership rate is Alaska owing to the frontier life that state offers to its denizens, and where firearms are as much a necessity for daily living as is water.
It's probably true about Alaska, even in Anchorage the largest city in the state, there are bears and moose in the city. Keep in mind that Anchorage is about the same size of city as St. Louis, Missouri, so that's kind of crazy thing. I remember living in Fairbanks, and being outside our apartment and there were moose in the woods across the street. And that wasn't at night usually! We had a moose walk right through our yard on post once too.

Puddleglum wrote:While I will also try to stay out of the political side of this, I must bring up the historical aspect of the argument, at least as it is made in the U.S.
the 2nd Amendment freedom to bear arms was, and is seen as a deterrent to an overreaching government. The founding fathers of our nation saw the abuses of such a government before, and during our war of independance, and saw the possibility of our own country's leadership doing the same. So they wanted the citizenry, both then, and now to also have the power to deter said abuse.
That being said, there are those who abuse these rights, and those who act irresponsibly.
Well said, Puddleglum.

Where I live in the US (eastern time zone), the big fireworks display last year started around 9:15 PM. It was cloudy last year, and it's not this year. So, when it's dark enough for the fireworks to show up they will start, probably 9:30 PM.

Last night, one of the neighbors did some big night fireworks, and they didn't really show up very well until after 9:30 PM.

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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby aileth » Jul 04, 2014 8:51 am

*Has this picture of IlF at the Dark Island, being pursued by a giant meat pie laced with Vegemite*

That is the problem with having national holidays in the summer in the north--the fireworks are generally so late at night. There is a really decent display near us on Canada Day, but it makes for a late night because of the drive home. So I don't get to go most of the time.

We were in the States for only one Fourth of July, and the fireworks were at night, but maybe some places they are done during the day. Wonder what they do in Alaska?
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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby SnowAngel » Jul 04, 2014 9:21 am

aileth wrote:We were in the States for only one Fourth of July, and the fireworks were at night, but maybe some places they are done during the day. Wonder what they do in Alaska?
In Alaska, they have fireworks on New Years Eve instead the 4th of July. :D

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Re: Cultural Curiosities: Life in Other Countries

Postby aileth » Jul 04, 2014 10:08 am

Oh, that makes sense!

Around here, people send off fireworks at New Years also, but it's mostly small stuff done privately. And late at night :D

When I was young, the fire department used to put on a good show at Halloween. Sometimes we would go up on the hillside above the valley to watch, as we could only see the very tallest ones from our house in the forest.
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