Books: 2nd Edition

The community lounge for non-Narnian discussions.

Moderators: stargazer, johobbit

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Meltintalle » Mar 03, 2018 9:10 pm

I'm currently following Valia down the G. K. Chesterton path. I just finished The Paradoxes of Mr. Pond myself. It's classic Chesterton: several vivid images splashed on the page and then a few brain-bending twists to make it all come out. There were a couple of stand-out stories in the collection. The Unmentionable Man may appeal to those fond of the Ruritanian genre, and The Ring of Lovers is quite brilliant.

The Man Who Knew Too Much is also a collection of mysteries and follows a slightly more conventional early British detective fiction style. (The detective character has some things in common with Sayers' Lord Peter Whimsey but lacks Lord Peter's gift of gab.)

I also just started Arcanum Unbound by Brandon Sanderson after having a couple of friends enthusiastically recommend The Emperor's Soul which, conveniently enough, was the first story in the collection. ;))

I finished The Women Who Wrote the War; it was quite good but I needed to take it at chapter a time just because of the scale and scope. It gave an interesting view of WWII, especially for one who tends to focus on certain areas to the exclusion of others. I left this book wanting to read more about certain areas and figures.

For my next non-fiction read I dove into Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves to Death which talks about how a culture is influenced by its primary form of communication.

...I feel like there's at least one other book in my recent leapfrogging from volume to volume that I wanted to comment on but now I can't think of what it is. ;))
Image
Visit the Silver Chair Reading Group!
User avatar
Meltintalle
Moderator
Ra-pun-z-mel
 
Posts: 7042
Joined: Oct 06, 2005
Location: Scanning your bookcases

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby ValiantArcher » Mar 08, 2018 8:47 pm

;)) Glad you enjoyed The Paradoxes of Mr. Pond, Mel!
It's interesting that your friends recommended The Emperor's Soul, because that was one of the stories I was told to skip when reading Arcanum Unbounded. ;)) But perhaps you've read the connected novel(s)?

I finished The Man Who Knew Too Much and also read Chesterton's The Ball and the Cross. I wasn't a fan of either, but the latter was even harder to make it through than the former. Both had some jarring racism, which - while not entirely surprising due to being written about 100 years ago - made me cringe and left a bad taste.
I feel like the concluding story of TMWKTM was supposed to be Important, but without the context for the strange setting (and the weight of the ending), it just feel kind of flat.
On the other hand, TBatC opens with a weird chapter but then gets down to being a slightly more reasonable story - and then makes a sudden drop into very weird and nightmarish ground. It also spends a good part of the book being an allegorical story and then suddenly changes its mind. It probably didn't help either that I didn't have lots of sympathy with the Catholic character, while the atheist seemed more understandable lots of the time. :P Also, since the big thing was The Duel, which kept getting interrupted in more and more ridiculous ways, the lack of resolution for it was a letdown. As in, they either should have fought the duel or come to crux and both decided they couldn't; having MacIan decide (after reuniting with Beatrice) that it would've been a sin to kill Turnball was very anti-climatic (even if it was the right decision).
Also, Beatrice and Madeline felt more like archetypes than people - which, granted, everyone introduced tended to be that way - but considering they were the love interests (how?) for MacIan and Turnball, who are the most like people in the story, the choice was rather frustrating.


On a tangential note, Mel is having her revenge for my dragging her down the Chesterton path - she has me reading another Chesterton, The Trees of Pride. ;)) Once I'm done with that, though, I'm going to sit on the last Chesterton I checked out for a while - I need a break. :P
User avatar
ValiantArcher
Moderator
BC Head and G&B Mod
 
Posts: 12278
Joined: May 16, 2007
Location: The Front Line

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby wild rose » Mar 08, 2018 11:30 pm

I was able to recently discover Ray Bradbury. I can't say how much I enjoyed Fahrenheit 451. My brother-in-law gave it to me for Christmas though I only got around to it recently because I had other books to read. I'm sorry now that I put it off for so long. It's really an amazing book. I'm now looking to find some more of Ray Bradbury's books.

Any that you would recommend?
Image
The ends must never justify the means, the means must justify themselves--Ravi Zacharias
sig by Meltintalle
User avatar
wild rose
Moderator
The Guardian of Sundays
 
Posts: 3609
Joined: Oct 26, 2009
Location: over the hills and far away
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby shastastwin » Mar 09, 2018 7:01 am

Did someone mention Bradbury? ;))

If you enjoyed Fahrenheit 451, wrose, I recommend picking up one of these:

Something Wicked This Way Comes: a coming-of-age story set in a small town, with lots of strange doings connected to a carnival that's recently arrived. It features Bradbury's classic lyrical style while demonstrating his skill for the eerie.

The Illustrated Man: One of his earliest story collections, this shows the range of Bradbury's imagination and features one of my favorite stories of his, "The Fire Balloons." This *might* be the closest to F451 of the three as far as tone and style (despite it being short stories vs. a novel).

The Martian Chronicles: A "fix-up" novel (essentially a story collection that's been padded with interstitial material to make it sellable as a novel; read it as a collection for the best effect) featuring Bradbury's favorite celestial obsession: Mars. Chronicling the future history of man's colonization of Mars, this collection is another showcase of Bradbury's range as a writer. Depending on which edition you get, it may include "The Fire Balloons," but most do not (sadly). This also has a favorite story of mine: "There will Come Soft Rains."

Hope that helps! :)
"All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies. And when they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you..."
Inexhaustible Inspiration
User avatar
shastastwin
Moderator Emeritus
Saint Schwinn
 
Posts: 9310
Joined: May 09, 2005
Location: Watership Down
Gender: Male

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby stargazer » Mar 10, 2018 6:32 pm

I can definitely echo shastastwin's recommendations about Bradbury. He was one of the authors I read a lot of growing up.

I still remember reading "There Will Come Soft Rains." In the mid-1960s the Cold War was very much a thing, and Bradbury's masterful yet subtle description of the outside of the house really stuck in my mind. Re-reading it now makes me think of "smart houses," something that was extremely futuristic when this story was written.

Another Bradbury I read way back when was Dandelion Wine. It made less of an impression, perhaps because I expected it to be more like his space stories, but instead had a much more nostalgic tone. Maybe I should pick it up again now that I'm ancient and perhaps better able to appreciate its nuance.
"The eclipse will melt your spine!'

- Overheard in a telephone pictionary game, August 2017
User avatar
stargazer
Moderator
 
Posts: 21689
Joined: Mar 28, 2004
Location: by a campfire

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby wild rose » Mar 11, 2018 7:00 am

Thanks so much for the recommendations. I promised my flatmate I would not buy anymore books (all because I am flying to Zambia in four months and it's extra weight), but I think I'll break and get at least one of those.

English books aren't easy to find and are usually overpriced, though I did find a Russian publishing house that prints books in English and the prices are much more reasonable. I'll hunt around this week, as I'm desperate for a new books. I've read everything I have so far. I know I should probably switch to ebooks, but somehow I just can't. I can't even focus on the book when I'm looking at a screen, I need the feel and smell of paper. It's a 'heavy' addiction. (if you get the pun ;) )

stargazer, I came across Dandelion Wine a week ago when I came across it in the bookshop. I agree that it has a completely different feel than Fahrenheit 451. I got the feeling that it's more of a slow moving book, though I just started. I'll write what I thought about it when I'm done.

I was able to find The Book Thief and bought it. What made me really excited is it happened to be an anniversary edition ith notes from the author in the back, pictures of original manuscripts and handwritten notes. It was really interesting as it gave me a look at the writing process.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Book Thief and enjoyed it much more than the movie. (Though I have to say the movie is awesome as well.) It's just the book had so much more detail. I loved the writing style Markus Zusak used and it was interesting the way he made Death. I liked how he showed that Death doesn't necessarily enjoy taking the lives of humans and when there is too much of it he gets annoyed and upset and hates the extra work.

I think of all the characters I loved Hans Hubermann best, and Rudy second.
Image
The ends must never justify the means, the means must justify themselves--Ravi Zacharias
sig by Meltintalle
User avatar
wild rose
Moderator
The Guardian of Sundays
 
Posts: 3609
Joined: Oct 26, 2009
Location: over the hills and far away
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby AJAiken » Mar 12, 2018 2:47 am

I read The Illustrated Man a couple of years ago and loved it, so I picked up Fahrenheit 451 but only got a couple of chapters in. I think it's likely I became distracted by another book, but it didn't grab me immediately the way Bradbury's short stories had. I need to give it another go. And it's not the only book I'm "currently reading" ... I need to clear my reading pile! :ymblushing:
User avatar
AJAiken
Moderator Emeritus
 
Posts: 1314
Joined: Feb 28, 2007
Location: Scotland
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby SnowAngel » Mar 29, 2018 9:57 pm

The Last of the Lost Boys book 3 in The Outlaws of Time by N.D. Wilson comes out in less than three weeks and I just found out about it. :-? :D I am going to keep a close eye on the library catalog for it.

I haven't been reading much the last couple weeks, family stuff going on. I'm still working on The Vanishing American Adult, I switched to the audiobook and I am almost done with it. I am currently reading A Refuge Assured by Jocelyn Green, so far I am enjoying it.

SnowAngel
Avatar by me
User avatar
SnowAngel
NarniaWeb Guru
Maiden of Monday Madness
 
Posts: 1686
Joined: Oct 25, 2008
Location: the United States of America
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby fantasia_kitty » Mar 31, 2018 12:04 pm

Has anybody read 'The Girl Who Drank the Moon?' I've been seeing it advertised all over the place with lots of awards. And the storyline sounds intriguing. I looked it up at our library and it looks like they got several copies, but they're so new they're not available to check out yet.
User avatar
fantasia_kitty
Site Admin
The Watchful Admin
 
Posts: 18389
Joined: Feb 06, 2004
Location: Kansas
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby fantasia_kitty » Apr 19, 2018 6:44 am

A different sort of post ;))

My husband and I decided to jump on the homeschooling bandwagon, and so we will be teaching our son at home next year. I found the perfect curriculum (for me) in Sonlight as it includes a TON of books. I've read a few of them, but most I haven't, and I'm really excited to share my love of reading with my kids this next year (I say kids because the younger two can't escape bwahahahaha).

I know there aren't many moms on this board that actively post, but there are quite a few older siblings, so I'm going to go ahead and ask this question. Did you or anyone you know have a hard time listening to a bigger chapter book, and do you know of ways to overcome that? This will be my first time reading chapter books to my son. I've tried in the past (Narnia!) and he just wasn't ready for it. I thought maybe if I provided some kind of art project, like coloring pages, that might help him have something to do while listening to the story. Thoughts?

Oh, and for the record, the first chapter book we start with is 'The Boxcar Children', which I might still have at my parents house. I'll have to call and ask hehehe.
User avatar
fantasia_kitty
Site Admin
The Watchful Admin
 
Posts: 18389
Joined: Feb 06, 2004
Location: Kansas
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby johobbit » Apr 19, 2018 7:34 am

My kids (especially our boys) really liked The Boxcar Children series. And it helped there were tons of stories to keep them reading for a long time. :D

All the best with the chapter books! When we sat down to read these longer books when they were young, they had the option of, yes, an activity to do while we read to them: stickers, colouring, (quiet) Lego/Duplo. That worked really well. And many times, they would become so enthralled with the story, I would notice they'd just be staring at me, captivated as I read, having forgotten for a time about their activity. ;))

On another note, I have been reading some great books lately (mostly bios), but will have to save that post for another time.
:)
User avatar
johobbit
Moderator
 
Posts: 15239
Joined: Feb 06, 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada ... under the northern sky
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby fantasia_kitty » Apr 19, 2018 9:32 am

At Jo's request, here's the full list of books for the year. Doesn't include encyclopedia-type books or textbooks.

The Arnold Lobel Book of Mother Goose
James Herriot's Treasury for Children
Egermeier's Bible Story Book
No Children, No Pets
Adventures in Ancient Greece
Out of Darkness
Capyboppy
The Good News Must Go Out
Johnny Appleseed: The Story of a Legend
The Llama Who Had No Pajama
Return of the White Book
The Apple & the Arrow
The Light at Tern Rock
The Hundred Dresses
My Father's Dragon
Twenty and Ten
Adventures with Waffles
Here's a Penny
In Grandma's Attic
The Boxcar Children
Least of All (this is one of my mom's favorites hehe)
Mary on Horseback
Winnie the Pooh
The Story of Dr. Dolittle
A Grain of Rice
The Family Under the Bridge
Dolphin Adventure
Dolphin Treasure
Richard Scarry's Please and Thank You Book
User avatar
fantasia_kitty
Site Admin
The Watchful Admin
 
Posts: 18389
Joined: Feb 06, 2004
Location: Kansas
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby coracle » Apr 21, 2018 10:09 am

Oh, I love "My Father's Dragon". I must have read it when my sister had it from the library, and found it years later as an adult. I have even written a script of it - but it wasn't performed.

I hope that is the AA Milne book, Winnie the Pooh. It has such a lovely feel to it which the Disney treatment lost.

Those are the only two I actually know, but the rest sound lovely.

I myself am ready for my annual read of Lord of the Rings, and this morning I found a one-volume copy in a charity shop, for £2.50 (maybe about $4 US?). This is much cheaper than buying individual ones at £8.99 each new.
I am far from home and my books are on the other side of the world.
User avatar
coracle
Moderator
NarniaWeb's Auntie
 
Posts: 19468
Joined: Feb 10, 2004
Location: Manchester, England
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Valiant_Nymph » Apr 29, 2018 4:30 pm

Has anyone read the Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb? I'm about to start reading it after I finish my finals! :)
Avatar by Rose Tree Dryad
User avatar
Valiant_Nymph
NarniaWeb Junkie
 
Posts: 610
Joined: Apr 28, 2018
Gender: Female

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby shastastwin » Apr 29, 2018 5:30 pm

I read the first book a year or two back and loved it! I stalled out in the second book, but I think that was just where I was at the time as far as what I wanted to read. I really need to go back and finish it.
"All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies. And when they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you..."
Inexhaustible Inspiration
User avatar
shastastwin
Moderator Emeritus
Saint Schwinn
 
Posts: 9310
Joined: May 09, 2005
Location: Watership Down
Gender: Male

Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby aileth » Apr 30, 2018 9:26 am

Can't help commenting on that list, fantasia.

The Arnold Lobel Book of Mother Goose = The Frog and Toad books by Lobel are my first choice for reading aloud. We had a record of "Frog and Toad All Year" growing up.

James Herriot's Treasury for Children = Heart-warming stories he tells. Have you read any of his stuff before? His vet stories are very funny, though not all of them are quite child-friendly.

Capyboppy = Anything by Bill Peet is amusing. A sadly neglected author these days.

Twenty and Ten = Didn't read this until just recently, and quite enjoyed it.

In Grandma's Attic = The whole series is great. We reworked some of these into VBS skits one year, when we didn't care for the material that was sent.

Winnie the Pooh = I agree with you, coracle. The originals are surprisingly different from what you might expect. And hilariously funny. At least, I found them so when I finally read them as an adult.

The Story of Dr. Dolittle = Ah! the pushmi-pullyu.

Richard Scarry's Please and Thank You Book = Anything by Richard Scarry is classic in my books (was that a pun that just slipped in?). "Busy, Busy World" and "What Do People Do All Day?" were childhood favourites, and "Best Word Book Ever" is indeed the most amusing dictionary I've ever seen.
Now my days are swifter than a post: they flee away ... my days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle
User avatar
aileth
NarniaWeb Junkie
Peripatetic powder-room sub
 
Posts: 626
Joined: Jan 02, 2014
Location: Western Canada
Gender: Female

PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Gymfan15 and 8 guests