Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

The community lounge for non-Narnian discussions.

Moderators: johobbit, stargazer

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Puddleglum » Feb 10, 2014 9:48 pm

W4J. I have been reading these posts with much interest, and must heartily agree with your last statement. Whenever the subject has to do with religion, Christianity in particular, people seem to have developed an intellectual lazy streak. Be it books, or movies dealing with Biblical topics I have heard people reference them in conversations as if it were direct gospel. If I ask where in the Bible can the reference be found I get a blank stare, or am told I need to be more open minded.
Puddleglum
NarniaWeb Junkie
 
Posts: 841
Joined: Nov 20, 2009
Location: Minnesota USA
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby IloveFauns » Feb 10, 2014 10:17 pm

Many non-religious people say many Christians do not even know their bible properly. A few times I have been talking to Christians and I know more about there religion than them(and I am no expert on it).

Have any of you seen bible man? It is very badly made which makes it very funny.
User avatar
IloveFauns
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 6427
Joined: Aug 22, 2008
Gender: Female

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Feb 10, 2014 11:56 pm

It's true that Bible illiteracy is at an all-time high, but I really question if those people where Christian then. Also, I have yet to find a non-Christian who knows more than most Christians about their religion. They proclaim to know much but they seem to twist it and turn it to their own liking or to discredit the Bible.
Currently watching:
Doctor Who - Season 11
User avatar
Warrior 4 Jesus
NarniaWeb Master
 
Posts: 10045
Joined: Mar 06, 2005
Location: Australia
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Feb 11, 2014 12:08 am

MinotaurforAslan wrote:I've been reading a lot about the Documentary Hypothesis over the past week and found it very interesting. Granted, it is only a hypothesis and not a theory ;)) but it does do a remarkable job at explaining some clunky narratives in the Pentateuch.

Wagga, I would be interested to know your thoughts on this video since you are a historian.



Interesting video but I think it's a load of nonsense.
Monotheism gave way to Polytheism, not the other way around. There are refutations against Enuma Elish giving rise to the Bible.

http://creation.com/is-genesis-1-just-reworked-babylonian-myth
http://www.tektonics.org/af/armstrongk01.php
http://www.tektonics.org/af/babgenesis.php

Also, the three reputedly different gods (El Elyon, El Shaddai and Yahweh) aren't different gods but expressions/understandings/facets of the one true God. As for Baal himself, he came about when Nimrod was deified, after the Tower of Babel. Those who didn't worship the one true God, deified their ancestors and kings and champion warriors and combined them together, also adding mythic exaggerations to spice up history.

Commandments like "You shall have no other gods before me", doesn't acknowledge the existence of pagan gods (as in that they were real gods) but the existence of paganism being rife amongst God's people (as was mentioned earlier, the worship of Asherah and Baal). God commanded a return to belief in Him and only Him, because He was their Creator, Saviour and Lord.

Currently watching:
Doctor Who - Season 11
User avatar
Warrior 4 Jesus
NarniaWeb Master
 
Posts: 10045
Joined: Mar 06, 2005
Location: Australia
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby King_Erlian » Feb 11, 2014 5:40 am

I was thinking on my way to work today... In the opening chapters of Genesis, it says that God commanded Adam and Eve not to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Assuming that this was historical fact, why did he put the Tree there in the first place? Was he just testing them for the sake of testing them? If he never intended Man to have the knowledge of good and evil, why didn't he leave the Tree out of the Garden?
User avatar
King_Erlian
NarniaWeb Guru
 
Posts: 1518
Joined: Feb 03, 2012
Location: Northern England
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby IloveFauns » Feb 11, 2014 6:34 am

Warrior 4 Jesus wrote:It's true that Bible illiteracy is at an all-time high, but I really question if those people where Christian then. Also, I have yet to find a non-Christian who knows more than most Christians about their religion. They proclaim to know much but they seem to twist it and turn it to their own liking or to discredit the Bible.


It was only 2 Christians so yes most do know more about the bible than me. Al ot of non-Christians that use to be christians tend to know a lot about the bible since they read deep into it and decided not to believe it anymore.
User avatar
IloveFauns
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 6427
Joined: Aug 22, 2008
Gender: Female

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Puddleglum » Feb 11, 2014 3:51 pm

W4J. Thanks for the video, it helps explain a few things when it comes to terminology, and language.
IlF. I cannot speak for the people you describe as once believing as I have never met them.
As for those whom I do know I can say usually come from similar backgrounds.
The first usually based their faith more in/on a particular pastor/priest. They put their trust in this person's teaching rather than study themselves. When this teacher fell away, or was exposed as hypoctitical the followers then fell away as the person who, they trusted with their faith failed them.
The other folks usually were the ones who were "born into" a christian professing family that they may have rebelled against, or were christian in name only.
In both cases, interestingly, these people sometimes become more interested in the bible than when they "believed". If for no other reason than to disprove the faith they never really had.
Puddleglum
NarniaWeb Junkie
 
Posts: 841
Joined: Nov 20, 2009
Location: Minnesota USA
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Feb 11, 2014 6:39 pm

A great introductory article on the pagan saviour god parallels:
http://www.tektonics.org/copycat/pagint.php

A treasure trove of information to critically refute such claims:
http://www.tektonics.org/copycathub.html
Currently watching:
Doctor Who - Season 11
User avatar
Warrior 4 Jesus
NarniaWeb Master
 
Posts: 10045
Joined: Mar 06, 2005
Location: Australia
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Feb 11, 2014 6:50 pm

IloveFauns wrote:It was only 2 Christians so yes most do know more about the bible than me. A lot of non-Christians that use to be Christians tend to know a lot about the bible since they read deep into it and decided not to believe it anymore.


Okay, thanks for clarifying that, Fauns. As your second point I have to disagree. The non-Christians who were formerly Christians may think they know much about the Bible, but they would be mistaken. They have allowed their standard to be something other than the Bible. If we use the Bible as our measuring stick and look around us, it's not surprising that what we see around us can be traced back to the truth of the Bible.
Currently watching:
Doctor Who - Season 11
User avatar
Warrior 4 Jesus
NarniaWeb Master
 
Posts: 10045
Joined: Mar 06, 2005
Location: Australia
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Feb 15, 2014 7:31 pm

King_Erlian wrote:I was thinking on my way to work today... In the opening chapters of Genesis, it says that God commanded Adam and Eve not to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Assuming that this was historical fact, why did he put the Tree there in the first place? Was he just testing them for the sake of testing them? If he never intended Man to have the knowledge of good and evil, why didn't he leave the Tree out of the Garden?


I can only answer from one of my own experiences which parallels your question. Years ago, I made a cake for dessert that evening, icing it as well. My two mischievous children watched me interestedly, and when I finished, I told them not to touch the cake, left on the sideboard whilst I hung out the washing. They knew that the cake was meant for when Daddy came home, when we could all eat it. But by the time I finished the laundry, I found the cake with a spiralling ridge where one of my little darlings had been helping herself to the icing on the cake. It was easy to find the culprit, due to the remains of icing on her fingers and around her mouth. :D

Would you have said then that I should not have made a cake at all? Or should I have put the cake in a bank safe? Nobody is told what would have happened, if Adam and Eve had resisted temptation. Perhaps Eve and Adam could have asked God's permission first, before helping themselves to the fruit they had been told to leave well alone. And maybe a reading of the Magician's Nephew might also provide a better explanation of not touching what doesn't belong to you to touch.

MinotaurforAslan wrote:I've been reading a lot about the Documentary Hypothesis over the past week and found it very interesting. Granted, it is only a hypothesis and not a theory ;)) but it does do a remarkable job at explaining some clunky narratives in the Pentateuch.

Wagga, I would be interested to know your thoughts on this video since you are a historian.


Yes, I have heard of the Documentary Hypothesis. And yes, it does explain a bit about there being what seems to be two traditions for both the Genesis story of Creation, for the account of the wanderings of the Israelites in the Desert and for there being the parallel accounts of Kings and Chronicles. But I wouldn't let these revisions, reediting and additions complicate matters too much, even for the Torah. You see, the core 10 commandments stay identifiably the same, whether in Deuteronomy or Exodus, even if the account of the Ark of the Covenant's provenance is different for these two books, one version being a less ornate description. By the way, most of the prophetic books of the Old Testament (Isaiah to Malachi) were written after the reign of the Israelite king Jeroboam II (786-746 BC), when Jonah famously went to Nineveh to get them to repent, leaving Israel, itself, to the warnings of Amos and others not to follow neighbouring countries' gods. Jonah is still buried in Iraq, at Nineveh. Allegedly. What is the problem about the bulk of Biblical contributors also ensuring that we, today, still have a Torah or Pentateuch to read?

I did watch the video and wasn't all that impressed with the way it was represented, to infer an atheistic view of the Bible. It is even more useless than inferring an automatic Biblical association of any Archaeological artifact found at all. At least the Bible, itself, is a source material to compare with, whilst the video is basically an opinion with some factual errors. For example, Asherah is not the name of a Canaanite goddess. According to the latest edition of Biblical Archaeological Review (Jan/Feb 2014) Asherah are actually groves and shrines. The Goddess the video might have been referring to was Astarte, a name later corrupted by the Greeks to Aphrodite, and considered by the Romans to be the same as their goddess Venus. And whilst Yahweh may or may not be interpreted to have been a Canaanite chief God originally, possibly called El Shaddei, I don't agree with the Video's opinions. Baal was the one hated by Hebrew Prophets, but this god was also accompanied by Moloch, the Canaanite god to which children were allegedly sacrificed. Why didn't the video mention either Astarte or Moloch as well as Baal?

The video also needs to sort out the differences between Judaism and Zoroastrianism, which did start in 600 BC, among Medes & Persians, the latter not being present at the 609 BC Battle of Carchemish, where Assyria was finally defeated and destroyed. Zoroastrianism, an almost monotheistic religion, could have been influenced by Judaism, which started about 1200 BC, as the Hebrew religion of the Exodus, even before David. Or it may have evolved from Zoroaster's take on polytheism. We simply don't know who Zoroaster was.

As a library science student in 1965 or 1966, I did study the origins of writing and also all about Assurbanipal's library. Archaeological Diggings Volume 20, no. 5 (Oct/Nov, 2013) has a useful article about the Flood story and the differing accounts. It uses archaeological and anthropological evidence to discuss not only Noah's flood but also the Gilgamesh epic of 17th or 18th century, the Akkadian Atrahasis Epic from 1600 BC, and the Sumerian King list, again from 1600 BC. Even though these Sumerian and Akkadian states weren't necessarily contemporary to each other, and even though in each case there is a creation story and a flood story, the details differ, not only from the story of Noah, but also from each other. As does the Roman creation and flood story, legends written down in Ovid's Metamorphoses, at the time of Augustus Caesar, bits of which I found myself translating in Leaving Certificate Latin in 1963-1964.

Yes, the Enuma Elish, found in the Assurbanipal library, is an ancient flood story. But even that clay tablet, part of the Gilgamesh epic, and now residing in the British Museum, was very possibly not the original copy of the story it is made out to be in the video, any more than were the parallel stories produced by Sumer and Akkad, bronze age contemporaries of Egypt's earlier dynasties. After all to write a story down from what could have been an oral tradition is the first step, then copies do have to be made from time to time, even if clay tablets are relatively durable, compared to paper, leather, metal, vellum or parchment. Even stone tablets can be broken up into little bits and destroyed. Yes, original old copies from 1600 BC or 1700 BC could have been stored in that library, especially if they were loot. But Assurbanipal, who lived to 627 BC, could have just as easily ordered his scribes to put together copies made from an original oral tradition or to replace a badly damaged earlier copy. As libraries are forced to do from time to time to this day.

And that was Assurbanipal's intention in assembling what has been found at Nineveh, to gather together what sorts of stories about the flood were extant in his day. But Assurbanipal, himself, was the great grandson of Sargon II, the king who demolished Samaria in 720 BC, and carted off the Israelites, destroying the city utterly. If anything survived of Israelite culture it would have been taken to Jerusalem by refugees, there to reside under the Judahite kings, well out of Assurbanipal's reach, especially if, like Manasseh or Amon, they had rejected their own culture in favour of worshipping other gods, and who were therefore not to be trusted.

Yes, I agree with the video that Abraham was the first one in Ur to realize there was only one God, not the multiple gods of Ur. However, Genesis, itself, makes that very clear, as does Abraham's expanded narrative in the Jewish Talmud. So there is no reason to twist the facts of Abraham's monotheistic realization to suit an atheistic point of view as is done in the Video. Abraham was told specifically by his God, to go to Harran, from which he was to go to Canaan. That Genesis account doesn't mean there couldn't also have been a pre-existing oral tradition about the flood, within Abraham's family, clan or tribe, descended from Noah, himself. Just as before I looked up my ancestry, I knew lots of things from what I heard from my grandmother.

The Bible, itself, in Samuel, Kings and Chronicles, tells us about colleges of priests and prophets in Israel and Judah. Or at least in Shiloh. Solomon, who traded with Hiram the Phoenician king of Tyre, and also his father David, both of whom built administrative centres, found by archaeologists, would have had the means to record the Torah and the ensuing annals of their kingdoms, including Judges and Ruth.

And whatever went beforehand, so as the Hebrew captives of Babylon would not suffer the fate of the previous "lost" tribes of Israel, of course there would have been some re-writing, re-compiling and new inclusions, even for the Torah, itself. Also, please don't forget the book found in the Temple and shown to the King Josiah (641-609 BC), still a child at that time. That book, believed to be Deuteronomy, wasn't written then just to suit Josiah. It had already been written some time previously and found in the renovations of Solomon's temple, since destroyed, in 586 BC. Because of the present political climate concerning the Al Aqsa Mosque, which, we believe, occupies the site of Solomon's temple, it would be impossible to conduct any archaeological searches there.

I therefore have to agree with W4J, at least partially, about the video. And I agree with him, fully, about Dan Brown's fictional The Da Vinci Code.
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 7894
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Feb 16, 2014 4:44 am

Excellent post, Wagga. You communicated much more eloquently than I ever could have. You're right about there being no pagan god called Asherah. I blundered there. The Asherah poles were used for the worship of a serpent god though, the one instigated by the worship of the serpent staff God told Moses to make and raise up in the wilderness to bring healing and life to all who looked on it.
Currently watching:
Doctor Who - Season 11
User avatar
Warrior 4 Jesus
NarniaWeb Master
 
Posts: 10045
Joined: Mar 06, 2005
Location: Australia
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby master oliver » Feb 16, 2014 5:24 pm

The Rose-Tree Dryad wrote:I'm having trouble pinpointing the exact time in the video, but I think I remember Nye saying that if there was new evidence that challenged the mainstream ideas about the age of the earth or the origin of life, such as anachronisms in the fossil record, he would evaluate it and change his opinion if necessary.


I'm not sure of the timestamp, but here is an image depicting what was said by each.


Image
I think I'm part of the forgetful club, but I forgot
User avatar
master oliver
Moderator Emeritus
Loose leaf tea enthusiast
 
Posts: 6083
Joined: Sep 30, 2004
Location: Oregon
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Warrior 4 Jesus » Feb 16, 2014 5:36 pm

Rubbish, rubbish, rubbish! Bill Nye and his ilk wouldn't change their beliefs for the world. There's plenty of evidence for creation, for intelligent design etc. it's just ignored or not considered because it doesn't line up with what they believe. The "debate" was a long-winded mess most of the time, but this time-stamp makes it look as if Nye was in the right.
Currently watching:
Doctor Who - Season 11
User avatar
Warrior 4 Jesus
NarniaWeb Master
 
Posts: 10045
Joined: Mar 06, 2005
Location: Australia
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby master oliver » Feb 16, 2014 6:08 pm

First of all, as I stated, I do not know the timestamp, but I believe that these were the responses given to a question put to both of them during the Q&A section of the debate, and that these were the responses given, but I could be wrong. It is possible that these were taken from to separate sections of the debate.

Second of all, I cannot see how you can say that Bill Nye and others who have been convinced by scientific observations, would never change their minds. As science is constantly improving itself, by working to rid itself of inaccurate, or outdated information. This means that scientists (including Bill Nye) do need to change their minds, as better information becomes available.

It seems to me, (although this may not be the case) that those who promote or believe intelligent design, may be the ones who are ignoring, or not considering the evidence, because at the end of the day, no matter what is presented, if you truly believe your Holy Book, you cannot admit that the evidence for evolution is credible, because if you do, it completely undermines the entire structure of the religion. With no creation, the garden of Eden and original sin are out, which means that Jesus is unnecessary.

At least, that's my take.
I think I'm part of the forgetful club, but I forgot
User avatar
master oliver
Moderator Emeritus
Loose leaf tea enthusiast
 
Posts: 6083
Joined: Sep 30, 2004
Location: Oregon
Gender: Male

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby IloveFauns » Feb 16, 2014 6:35 pm

@master olive I agree with what you are saying and it was going to be my reply to w4j. I have looked into the "evidence" for creation and well it really isnt evidence and many of it has been disproved my science. Also no the bible is not evidence itself.
User avatar
IloveFauns
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 6427
Joined: Aug 22, 2008
Gender: Female

Re: Christianity, Religion and Philosophy, Episode VI!

Postby Arwenel » Feb 16, 2014 9:10 pm

master oliver wrote:It seems to me, (although this may not be the case) that those who promote or believe intelligent design, may be the ones who are ignoring, or not considering the evidence, because at the end of the day, no matter what is presented, if you truly believe your Holy Book, you cannot admit that the evidence for evolution is credible, because if you do, it completely undermines the entire structure of the religion. With no creation, the garden of Eden and original sin are out, which means that Jesus is unnecessary.

At least, that's my take.


Disclaimer -- i'm a young-earth creationist, but for philosophical/theological reasons rather than evidentiary, and have only philosophical support for what i'm about to say.

I don't think it's a matter of ignoring or disregarding evidence on either side so much as a difference of worldview.

The secular evolutionist begins with the presupposition that the material universe is all there is, that everything can be understood with science and reason, that there is no external First Cause to the universe, and no need for one. From that perspective, any evidence indicating a god or outside force simply hasn't been properly understood yet.

The biblical creationist begins with the presupposition that an eternal God created everything, that the Bible might not be a scientific textbook but can be relied upon, that the whole of creation points to a divine Creator and declares His glory. Any evidence that doesn't fit with that viewpoint simply hasn't been properly understood yet.

Everybody starts with a presupposition; they can't operate without them. I suppose it's possible to come prepared to accept whatever the evidence says, but if you aren't willing to change your fundamental premise -- either there is a God or there isn't -- then the evidence can only do so much. As C.S. Lewis put it, Nature does not teach, it only shows us what we come prepared to see.

I don't mean that all scientists let their biases get in the way of the data, or that there is no hope to prove creation (or evolution, i suppose) by the evidence, but i think the fact that intelligent, well-informed people stand on both sides of the argument is an indication that the evidence at present does not spell out "evolution!" or "creation!" in flaming letters ten feet high.
I have heard there are troubles of more than one kind
Some come from above, some come from behind
But I've bought a big bat, I'm all ready you see
Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!
~ Dr. Seuss
User avatar
Arwenel
NarniaWeb Guru
"We Mistborn need not make sense." (BC)
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Oct 01, 2006
Location: Access Restricted
Gender: Female

PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests