Books: 2nd Edition

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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby SnowAngel » Apr 30, 2018 6:14 pm

fantasia_kitty wrote:My husband and I decided to jump on the homeschooling bandwagon, and so we will be teaching our son at home next year. I found the perfect curriculum (for me) in Sonlight as it includes a TON of books.
Way to go, fantasia! :ymapplause: My family loves Abeka for most subjects, Apologia for science, and A Reason For Handwriting for handwriting. :) It's alway fun to see what works best for other homeschoolers, so cool that you like Sonlight.

Ditto what Jo said about blocks and coloring. My siblings liked wooden blocks as well as Duplos during storytime. Another favorite was Melissa and Doug puzzles, we had a million of those. ;) Timberdoodle has some great brain toys that would also work during storytime and just cool educational paraphernalia.

My April reading has been less than March, barely just four books. I was trying to finish Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden and The Trial by Robert Whitlow before May, but I only read a few pages over the weekend so that's not happening now.

April 2018 reads:
*The Sea Before Us by Sarah Sundin - love it!
*12 Strong by Doug Stanton - excellent, hard to read because of the realism and also the Middle Eastern names/places
*A Refuge Assured by Jocelyn Green - didn't care for it, but still have to write a review for it
*A Borrowed Dream by Amanda Cabot - second book in the series and it felt like it, which is a good thing :)

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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Valiant_Nymph » May 04, 2018 4:08 pm

I'm rereading The Return of the King right now. I haven't read this volume in awhile, for some reason. I've read Fellowship so many times ;))
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby fantasia_kitty » May 05, 2018 11:28 am

@SnowAngel, looks like I might have to resurrect the long-dead homeschooling thread hehe.
Abeka (as far as I can tell) is the most popular program in the country. And while there were several books that I liked, it wasn't my favorite that I looked at. :) I'm still thinking of snagging a couple, but as I've probably already bitten off more than I can chew this year, I may wait. ;)
Apologia I'm saving for later. I like this one, but they don't have Kindergarten level.
Timberdoodle was one I very seriously looked at. I'm such a Science/Math person. ;))
What I ended up going with was Sonlight (as I mentioned before), Logic of English (highly recommended by a friend, and I really liked they way it looked), and Shiller Math (a Montessori based program with lots of sensory tools that I think will help my wild and crazy kiddo). :)

But back on topic, I READ A BOOK! First one this year I think. :ymblushing: I mentioned it on the previous page, 'The Girl who Drank the Moon.' :) It's a teenage level fantasy book, and I liked it just fine, probably 6.5/10. If you all have read 'Serafina,' it's right in line with that style. I definitely prefer books that are more in-depth, both in character and plot development.
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby ValiantArcher » May 05, 2018 4:27 pm

SA, I heard very little buzz for the new Wilson book before it came out. Have you read it yet? :)
I also heard N. D. Wilson just signed a new book contract, but no word yet on what it's for or when the book will come out.

I've enjoyed your thoughts on the homeschool curriculums and the book lists, fk. :) I've read remarkably few of the books on that list, though - just The Boxcar Children, Twenty and Ten, and possibly The Story of Dr. Dolittle. I have read a lot of Herriot and love Richard Scarry, though. ;))
My parents used to read to us in bed/right before bed, and I don't remember us having anything to do then (besides try to fall asleep? ;)) ). However, I do remember some occasions of being read to where we would color or draw - or fold laundry, when we got a little older. ;)) We would also occasionally be read to during mealtimes. :)

Enjoy your reread of RotK, Valiant_Nymph! :D

March and April weren't great months for reading, so I kinda dropped off the thread. :ymblushing:

I did finish The Trees of Pride by G. K. Chesterton eventually - it was okay, though I wasn't overly happy with the ending or some of the reveals. I did also read Chesterton's Four Faultless Felons, but I really only liked "The Honest Quack" of the four stories.
I've read a handful of other books semi-recently, but one of the most recent was True Grit by Charles Portis. I knew the title from the movie that came out a few years back (or more?) but haven't seen it, so I knew nothing beyond the very basic premise. The book didn't match up with my impression from the movie trailers, but oh well. ;)) Overall, I found it okay - probably most interesting elements to me were the travels through and history connected to Indian Territory.

I am currently reading Sad Cypress by Agatha Christie. I'm not far enough in to make judgments, besides a mild curiosity to find out "whodunnit" as it's been rather hinted that the obvious suspect isn't it. ;))
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Valiant_Nymph » May 05, 2018 8:25 pm

Thanks Valiant Archer!

I have a friend who is a professor of English and Christian studies with whom I'm hoping to start a Narnia reading group with! I will post about how it goes. :)
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Meltintalle » May 06, 2018 4:27 pm

Valia wrote:It's interesting that your friends recommended The Emperor's Soul, because that was one of the stories I was told to skip when reading Arcanum Unbounded. ;)) But perhaps you've read the connected novel(s)?
...I was under the impression that the novel wasn't out yet?? Unlike the one where it was the text speculation that later became a graphic novel. :-? (I...liked the text version of that more than the illustrated, though there are pros and cons to each style of narration.)

I don't know if anyone remembers, but I have an in-progress goal of reading every book on the Newbery Award and Honors list. I've not kept up with the new ones for the last couple of years, so last month I read several of the newer books. \:D/

One of the ones I enjoyed was The Girl Who Drank the Moon. It had a bit of a dreamy, other-worldly sort of feel, and that and the cutting between different perspectives might be off-putting to some readers. (I want to say it was like Gormenghaust lite but that's not an entirely fair comparison.)

I also liked Wolf Hollow and Turtle in Paradise which were about children growing up in the 1940s and 1930s but in vastly different settings and situations. Wolf Hollow is a take on the 'something happens in a rural farming community' genre and Turtle in Paradise is 'new kid on the block'.

I have fond memories of going through the book sections of homeschooling catalogs and making lists of books to find at the library. That said, I only remember reading about half of the ones on the fantasia's list. ;))

aileth wrote:Capyboppy = Anything by Bill Peet is amusing. A sadly neglected author these days.
This title sounds new to me, but with such a recommendation I'm going to have to look it up. *moments later* AH! No, I haven't read that one, but I did read Chester the Wordly Pig. B-)

Valia wrote:[True Grit] didn't match up with my impression from the movie trailers, but oh well. ;))
I remember having the same experience when I read it awhile back. ;))
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby fantasia_kitty » May 06, 2018 7:49 pm

@aileth, I missed your post! Glad Mel quoted you or I wouldn't have seen it at all.

I love Frog and Toad! In fact, I was just looking at those books as a birthday gift idea for my nephew. (Also thinking about Little Critter. ;)) )

Yes, I remember my mom reading several of the James Harriot collection when I was little, but for some reason the only story that stuck in my mind is the one about Moses the kitten. I'll be curious to see how many stories come back to me.

And yes coracle, it is the original Winnie the Pooh by Milne. :) I'm pretty sure I have The House at Pooh Corner SOMEWHERE in my library, but I haven't found it yet. But I didn't have this one so it's fun to add it to the collection. :)
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Valiant_Nymph » May 09, 2018 4:06 pm

Has anyone read Quiet: The Power of Introverts by Susan Cain? ;;)

I found it a very fascinating book, and it helped me a lot to learn about my introversion and how to cope in day to day situations. If anyone else has read it, I'd love to hear your thoughts.
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby SnowAngel » May 09, 2018 8:56 pm

fantasia_kitty wrote:@SnowAngel, looks like I might have to resurrect the long-dead homeschooling thread hehe.
Abeka (as far as I can tell) is the most popular program in the country. And while there were several books that I liked, it wasn't my favorite that I looked at. :) I'm still thinking of snagging a couple, but as I've probably already bitten off more than I can chew this year, I may wait. ;)
Apologia I'm saving for later. I like this one, but they don't have Kindergarten level.
Timberdoodle was one I very seriously looked at. I'm such a Science/Math person. ;))
What I ended up going with was Sonlight (as I mentioned before), Logic of English (highly recommended by a friend, and I really liked they way it looked), and Shiller Math (a Montessori based program with lots of sensory tools that I think will help my wild and crazy kiddo). :).
You definitely have to time to experiment with curriculum since you just getting started. Mom did that, we tried a couple of additional companies for math, the only one we enjoyed (besides Abeka) was Teaching Textbooks. I loved TT's geometry; however one of my sisters hated it, but loved their algebra. Funny how differently siblings can view the same curriculum/subjects.

I think the problem is never really the number of books, but the lack of time for the number of books. ;)

I think Mom has sixth grade and up for Apologia.

Oh, if you like science/math then Timberdoodle is definitely for you. They have some of the coolest stuff. We really enjoy the games we have that Timberdoodle has had: TENZI, Gobblet!, Trans America, etc. (Not sure if they still sell them.)

Most of my cousins and many of my friends growing were homeschool, and everyone had a slight different group of curriculum. I could talk homeschooling for just about forever. :D

ValiantArcher wrote:SA, I heard very little buzz for the new Wilson book before it came out. Have you read it yet? :)
I also heard N. D. Wilson just signed a new book contract, but no word yet on what it's for or when the book will come out.
Still waiting for the library to get The Last of the Lost Boys in, should be any day now. :)

I read True Grit a few years, I have seen both movies and it is very different. I like the John Wayne movie version of the story best. :D

I finished a couple of books I started in April; The Trial by Robert Whitlow and Grayfox by Michael Phillips.

I have started A Cry From The Dust by Carrie Stuart Parks, still reading Black Hawk Down. Oh, I am also reading The Golden Vial (Legends of the Realm #3) by Thomas Locke and even though I am only a few chapters I already hate it. I can't believe this is the third and probably final book in the series. It stinks! I loved Emissary, it was fun and a little different, but the following books did not even come close. Merchant of Alyss was okay, not terrible, but not great either. And then comes The Golden Vial and any hope of the series returning to where it started is so gone. The characters I enjoyed in the previous books haven't even made an appearance yet.

But I am enjoying A Cry From The Dust, I am reading it at Scarlet's recommendation. :)

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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Valiant_Nymph » May 11, 2018 11:35 am

Has anyone read the Farseer Trilogy? I'm looking for a good, new fantasy series to read.

I wish Lewis and Tolkien were around to give recommendations ;))
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby SnowAngel » May 13, 2018 8:14 pm

I am not much for fantasy other than Narnia, Valiant_Nymph, but I did enjoy Unblemished by Sara Ella. It's the only book in the series I have read, and that reminds me I should suggest my library get the series. :)

In the last few days I have finished three books and read a third of another. I just might make some good progress on my TBR pile this month. :) I finished The Golden Vial yesterday morning and wrote my review immediately. I will not be keep that one. I also finished A Cry From The Dust and The Bone Will Speak. And I am just past a third of the way through When Death Draws Near. I totally understand why Scarlet loves the Gwen Marcey series. Carrie Stuart Parks is an excellent writer.

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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Valiant_Nymph » May 14, 2018 2:49 pm

Thank you, SnowAngel! I will check it out :)
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby SnowAngel » May 24, 2018 9:55 pm

The Last of the Lost Boys finally came in at the library. Tomorrow I am going to start a quick reread of The Legend of Sam Miracle and The Song of Glory and Ghost before reading The Last of the Lost Boys. I have no time to linger over the series, since three of my sisters are waiting for me to finish it so then they came "fight" over who's next in line. ;)

I finished the Gwen Marcey series a couple days ago, it was awesome. But I need a fifth book...I simply must know how things turn out with Gwen and Blake. :ymbringiton:

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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby Meltintalle » May 26, 2018 11:23 am

Valiant_Nymph, I haven't read anything by Robin Hobb (though the name keeps coming up it's still in the 'someday' category ) but I misread Farseerer as Farsala--which is a YA political fantasy adventure series by Hilari Bell--and was like, Wow! Someone else who's read...wait, no, that's not what it said. ;)) I'd recommend the author for fans of Lloyd Alexander, Sherwood Smith, and Leigh Bardugo.

*makes a note to hunt down Last of the Lost Boys* I wonder if I ought to also refresh my memory of Peter Pan?

Last week I went on a Janette Oke binge and devoured 3/4ths of the Prairie Legacy series and the last three of the Love Comes Softly series. I found a cameo for A Woman Named Damaris in the second Prairie Legacy book and would have read that one too if it had been on the shelf. ;)) I'd forgotten just how much story could be packed into a few simple words and this was a good change of pace as well as a much enjoyed re-read.
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby johobbit » Jun 12, 2018 10:51 am

wild rose, from back in March wrote:I know I should probably switch to ebooks, but somehow I just can't. I can't even focus on the book when I'm looking at a screen, I need the feel and smell of paper.

Ditto-ditto and hear-hear! I'm with you in this. ;))

I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Book Thief and enjoyed it much more than the movie. (Though I have to say the movie is awesome as well.) It's just the book had so much more detail

Indeed! And, yes, having Death as the Narrator is fascinating.

That is such an interesting reading list, fantasia! Many of these titles bring back memories of reading when our kids were young. ♥ And when I was young! :D


aileth wrote:The originals [Winnie-the-Pooh] are surprisingly different from what you might expect. And hilariously funny. At least, I found them so when I finally read them as an adult.

Yes, yes! I couldn't get over how clearly and humorously they were written when I re-read them as an adult. I thought they were adorable 'when I was very young' ( ;) ), but there is no doubt much of the humour went right by me then.

Valiant_Nymph wrote:I'm rereading The Return of the King right now.

Aahhh, enjoy! ♥ I always slow waaay down when I approach "The Grey Havens" chapter, because I never want that marvelous book to end!

Oh dear, I last updated my reading in January of this year, gulp. I can't recall all I have read since them, but there have been some great books, a few of which are:

Secret Germany by Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh: an in-depth look and analysis into the July 1944 assassination attempt of Hitler by Claus Stauffenberg and co. Not only is the story recounted, but much of the book deals with the history and what brought Germany—and Stauffenberg—to this point. (The 2008 film is well done, and very accurate, according to the book, but we do wish that instead of casting Tom Cruise as Stauffenberg, they had cast the marvelous Thomas Kretschmann instead.)

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer (one of the climbers): What a page-turner, as, in detail, it tells of the disastrous 1996 Everest climb. (The comparable movie was out in 2015, simply called Everest. Very well done.)

A Special Fate by Alison Leslie Gold: I find more and more stories are being written about everyday heroes in the WW 2 era, who rose so bravely to the occasion. This book covers the life of Japanese diplomat in Lithuania, Chiune Sugihara, who saved hundreds of Jewish lives by going directly against orders by issuing visas to them so they could escape.

Winston Churchill by his Personal Secretary by Elizabeth Nel (who only passed away in 2007 at the age of 90): this is a favourite! I'm nearly finished it now, but as with other treasures, I do not want it to end.

William Wilberforce by Kevin Belmonte: this is a re-read for me. I never tire of delving into the life of this great man, and a hero of the faith for me.

To Be Where You Are by Jan Karon: I think this is her latest Mitford book, which is delightful, as always.

I have on order:
The Radium Girls (WW 1 female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning in their workplaces)
At Dawn We Slept (Pearl Harbour)
The Astronomy of the Bible: An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture, and written in the early 1900s! (recommended to me by MotherMusic)

A question: I really enjoy listening to audio dramas whilst doing working around the house ... what is an excellent audio drama for the Harry Potter books? I would also be interested in a well-read audio book of the same. Suggestions, please.
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Re: Books: 2nd Edition

Postby shastastwin » Jun 12, 2018 11:19 am

I'm not aware of any radio dramas of the HP books, jo, but both the American (Jim Dale) and British (Stephen Fry) narrators of the audio books do a fantastic job with the voices. They have different voices for all the characters, so it's almost like a radio drama with all the narration included.
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