Chapter 12 The Dark Island

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Chapter 12 The Dark Island

Postby Pattertwigs Pal » Sep 23, 2015 3:44 am

1. What do the character's reactions to the darkness (both before entering and once inside) tell us about their personalities?

2. Why is Reepicheep the only one not effected by the Dark Island?

3. The British and American editions are different. Refer to the chart found here to see the differences. (The paragraph before the chart contains an opinion on the significance of the changes. If you want to form your own ideas, skip right to the chart). How do these differences change the meaning of the chapter? Which version do you prefer and why?

4. The British version states, "And all at once everybody realized that there was nothing to be afraid of and never had been." What does this mean about what they experienced in the Darkness and Rhoop experienced on the island?

5. Do you agree with Reepicheep that they had to sail into the Darkness in order to maintain their honor?

6. If you were faced with the Dark Island, would you react like the majority of the characters or would you react more like Reepicheep?

7. What is significant about Lucy's experience with the albatross?

8. What do you think caused the Dark Island to appear?
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Re: Chapter 12 The Dark Island

Postby Pattertwigs Pal » Sep 19, 2016 8:15 pm

1. What do the character's reactions to the darkness (both before entering and once inside) tell us about their personalities?
Reepicheep hold honor very high. He has no fear. I think at first Drinian wanted to avoid the darkness because it would be difficult to steer the ship. Once inside he is able to control himself well enough that he is able to do his job but he is frightened. Edmund seems to be interested in the adventure and yet there is a part of him that is wanting to avoid the darkness. Lucy does not want to appear more afraid than the others, so she agrees to go in. She is the very close to Aslan. She reaches out to him to save them. Most of the others are fearful of the darkness and

2. Why is Reepicheep the only one not effected by the Dark Island?
The island seems to prey on fears. Reepicheep doesn’t have any fears so they island leaves him alone.
3. The British and American editions are different. Refer to the chart found here to see the differences. (The paragraph before the chart contains an opinion on the significance of the changes. If you want to form your own ideas, skip right to the chart). How do these differences change the meaning of the chapter? Which version do you prefer and why?
In the British version the island is destroyed and no one else will be tortured by it. Aslan not only rescues them but destroys the island.
I prefer the British edition because I like the island being destroyed and its being done by Aslan.

4. The British version states, "And all at once everybody realized that there was nothing to be afraid of and never had been." What does this mean about what they experienced in the Darkness and Rhoop experienced on the island?
It was very dreamlike – or rather nightmare like. I assume it seems very real at a time just like a dream would. The nightmares cannot hurt the person. It is the fear which makes the island terrifying not the actual creatures on it.

5. Do you agree with Reepicheep that they had to sail into the Darkness in order to maintain their honor?
I’m not 100% sure what all Reepicheep means by honor. I’m not sure I agree with him that the purpose of the voyage is “to seek honour and adventure.” It’s main purpose is to find the 7 Lords. In a way, they do did to sail into it to preserve their honor; it would not be honorable to avoid a place where a missing lord might be because one was afraid.

6. If you were faced with the Dark Island, would you react like the majority of the characters or would you react more like Reepicheep?
Unfortunately, I would react like the majority of the characters. My imagination would run away with me. I think I would call out to Aslan like Lucy did.

7. What is significant about Lucy's experience with the albatross?
It shows that when we cry out to God, the answer can come in different ways. Alsan didn’t appear in the form of a lion. He didn’t take away the darkness right away but gave Lucy comfort inside of her. He led them through the darkness into the light. Lucy had faith even in the darkest moment.

8. What do you think caused the Dark Island to appear?
I’m not sure. It appears to be an actual place and location. I guess it might be a kind of a test or just an evil place.
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Re: Chapter 12 The Dark Island

Postby aileth » Oct 12, 2016 11:40 am

1. What do the character's reactions to the darkness (both before entering and once inside) tell us about their personalities?
They were all very human in their response. It was unanimous that no one really wanted to go in to begin with (except Reep, of course). There would appear to have been a malign influence felt, even before they got into the darkness itself, or heard what happened there. The English ones didn't want to be afraid, or were ashamed to admit it, unlike the sailors, who had no hesitation in saying so. But then sailors were traditionally superstitious; this wasn't the only time they grumbled.

2. Why is Reepicheep the only one not affected by the Dark Island?
It seems that he has no fears, so he would have no reason to dread his worst fears coming to life.

3. The British and American editions are different. Refer to the chart found here to see the differences. (The paragraph before the chart contains an opinion on the significance of the changes. If you want to form your own ideas, skip right to the chart). How do these differences change the meaning of the chapter? Which version do you prefer and why?
(Small nit-pick on the Wikipedia entry: my copy, the 1980 Collins' Fontana Lions edition, has the original British text, so they reverted earlier than 1994)
I guess I prefer the British version, partly because it is the one with which I am familiar (never knew there was another till recently). Though I am swayed by that lovely description of the joy of waking up after a nightmare. But then you lose Lucy's statement of faith:
Lewis wrote:"Why!" cried Lord Rhoop. "You have destroyed it!"
"I don’t think it was us," said Lucy.

I also like the idea that that particular island would never bother anyone ever again. It doesn't strike me that there is much risk of this episode being seen as a laughing matter, in either version.

4. The British version states, "And all at once everybody realized that there was nothing to be afraid of and never had been." What does this mean about what they experienced in the Darkness and Rhoop experienced on the island?
In the end, nothing did happen to them, as Lucy herself said. I don't think that Lewis was discounting the reality of fears. He gave a fairly comprehensive gallery of them while the ship was in the dark. "Perfect love casts out fear," is the word that comes to my mind. Had Rhoop ever thought to call out to Aslan? It's doubtful, seeing that he was a Telmarine lord, to whom the great Lion would have been seen as an enemy. And yet, even if he didn't, Aslan was preparing a means of rescue for him.

5. Do you agree with Reepicheep that they had to sail into the Darkness in order to maintain their honor?
Well, hardly; after all, they had turned out of the way to go towards this unknown place. I refuse to take dares on principle; too many people will do foolish things to prove that they "aren't scared." However, when you consider that one of the seven lords was there, perhaps Reepicheep was right. Not so much about honour, though; simply that it was necessary for them to get there to rescue Rhoop.

6. If you were faced with the Dark Island, would you react like the majority of the characters or would you react more like Reepicheep?
Definitely like the majority; I'm not afraid of the dark, per se, but that sounded particularly frightening. And if everyone else was panicking, I'd be affected by that also.

7. What is significant about Lucy's experience with the albatross?
She was the only one who heard the words--she was the one who had called to Aslan for help. I wonder if Lewis was thinking of Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner, where the albatross represented Christ. Also the source of one of our modern meanings for an albatross, being a weight of guilt or an unwanted burden.

8. What do you think caused the Dark Island to appear?
Was it once an ordinary island, with some curse placed upon it? What would have persuaded Rhoop to have gone there in the first place?
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Re: Chapter 12 The Dark Island

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Oct 15, 2016 11:51 pm

1. What do the character's reactions to the darkness (both before entering and once inside) tell us about their personalities?

Nobody is exactly afraid of the dark, in itself. Though the Captain and the sailors do have practical concerns. They do need light to see by, and getting snagged on a rock is a very real fear for sailors, and their captain. Today we still close airports and cancel flights when there is a volcanic eruption, for example. It is because Caspian realises the journey might be tricky that he asks Drinian and doesn't command. And the other humans, even Edmund, tend to agree. Why does Edmund almost agree in my version? (Grafton p.137) It is also what their imaginations and nightmares suggest later that defines their individual personalities

2. Why is Reepicheep the only one not affected by the Dark Island?

Of course Reepicheep wouldn't be affected by the Dark Island. He is a mouse that isn't afraid of your average cat, he knows what he is doing on board the Dawn Treader, and has confidence on achieving his goals sooner or later. He knows about humans and that managing them is just like herding cats. And he knows that the Head Lion of them all is his best friend. :D

3. The British and American editions are different. Refer to the chart found here to see the differences. (The paragraph before the chart contains an opinion on the significance of the changes. If you want to form your own ideas, skip right to the chart). How do these differences change the meaning of the chapter? Which version do you prefer and why?

Yes there are differences, but then the Americans seem to have a different idea of what is funny and what isn't. The British do have traditionally a more biter/bit sense of humour and call it making a fool of oneself. And they are more conscious, I think, of proverbs such as Pride goeth before a fall. And also why, I guess, I prefer the British version where Lucy doesn't take the credit due to what she knows is Aslan's intervention.

4. The British version states, "And all at once everybody realized that there was nothing to be afraid of and never had been." What does this mean about what they experienced in the Darkness and Rhoop experienced on the island?

Meaning that in the end they were afraid of their own imaginations, and that if they had prayed for guidance and trusted Aslan to respond, they might not have had a problem in the first place.

5. Do you agree with Reepicheep that they had to sail into the Darkness in order to maintain their honor?

I think, from his point of view, yes. He is sure he is going the right way. It is definitely in an easterly direction.

6. If you were faced with the Dark Island, would you react like the majority of the characters or would you react more like Reepicheep?

Probably like the majority of the characters. It is easy to judge them but like the majority of the characters I am human, also, and Reepicheep is spared that predicament. Also, he is not sailing the ship.

7. What is significant about Lucy's experience with the albatross?

Albatrosses are often birds of ill-omen as in the Rime of the Ancient Mariner, but when all else is lost why should anyone fear ill-omen? It is already upon the fearer.
But this particular albatross arrived because of Lucy's prayer, and as if to signature its appearance, it shed light on the problem. By the way, Lucy's very name means light.

8. What do you think caused the Dark Island to appear?

It was already there when Lord Rhoop got so far and when it tempted him. It had to remain as long as Lord Rhoop stayed there, at least.

I've a question about Lord Rhoop. In the movie they mixed and matched the three sleepers scene to appear before we see Lord Rhoop, but the book says otherwise. Which order do you feel flows better?

The movie at least explains how the ship might have disappeared, but is that really important when the seven lord's quest effectively ends at Ramandu's Island? What do you think the masterful Lord's reaction was likely to have been when the previous five lords left the ship? What do you think of his remark that they weren't meant to live like animals? And had he remained in Narnia, would he have stayed there? Or do you think he would have eventually left with the other Telmarines after Miraz died?
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