Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Moderator: Pattertwigs Pal

Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby Pattertwigs Pal » Jul 22, 2015 3:52 am

1. Do you think Lewis's description on how the townspeople reacted to the procession is accurate to real life? Why or Why not?

2. Have you spotted the mistake in Pauline Baynes's drawing of the parade?

3. What do you think of Bern's plan? Is there anything you would have done differently?

4. What do you think of Gumpas? How is he an effective or ineffective governor?

5. What would you have done if you were Gumpas?

6. How do you think Bern will compare to Gumpas as a governor? What do you think Lord Bern will be like as the new Duke?

7. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be? What does this “research” and the fact that in Lucy and Edmund’s time the Lone Islanders couldn’t tell them what was beyond the Islands tell us about the character of the Lone Islanders?

8. How would you feel if you were on sale at a slave market?

9. How would you describe Lord Bern? What are his strengths and weaknesses? If war with Calormen were to arise, do you think he would be able to handle it?

10. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be? [feel free to ignore this question it is a duplicate. :ymblushing: ]

11. What theme or themes do you see in this chapter and how do you rate their validity and importance?
Image
Silver Chair Reading Group
NW sister to Movie Aristotle & daughter of the King
User avatar
Pattertwigs Pal
Moderator
Cookie Queen of NarniaWeb
 
Posts: 4947
Joined: May 16, 2009
Location: U.S.A.
Gender: Female

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby King_Erlian » Jul 23, 2015 5:35 am

2. Have you spotted the mistake in Pauline Baynes's drawing of the parade?
Lucy, Edmund and Eustace are in the parade, when they're still in the slave ship or on their way to the slave market. Also, Lewis describes the soldiers' armour as shining so brightly you could hardly look at it, but it doesn't look very shiny in the picture.
User avatar
King_Erlian
NarniaWeb Guru
 
Posts: 1410
Joined: Feb 03, 2012
Location: Northern England
Gender: Male

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby Anhun » Jul 26, 2015 6:02 pm

1. I kind of imagine Redhaven as a provincial port town, rather than a bustling metropolis, so I think it very realistic that everyone would gather around out of curiosity to see who these strange people are and what they were doing. I've seen this in reality. Strangers walk through a village, and before you know it the whole village is following them around.

Image

Yes, I know this is a scene from a movie, not real life, but it illustrates the same type of scenario.

7. It seems to me as though the Lone Islanders have a strong fear of the unknown. Given the misadventures that we see later on in the book, those fears seem quite reasonable.
User avatar
Anhun
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 480
Joined: Dec 29, 2010
Location: P3R-233

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jul 31, 2015 4:41 am

1. Do you think Lewis's description on how the townspeople reacted to the procession is accurate to real life? Why or Why not?

I'm not surprised how the townspeople reacted to the procession. It is the way things still can happen in Sydney when, for example, the Americans, or other friendly navy ships come into port. When Royalty pays a visit, or the Pope. Or when our sports people or armed forces return to Australia, especially when they are victorious. Even the first fleeters got curious Aborigines marvelling at these strangely dressed people when they landed in Port Jackson in 1788, and one poor bloke had to strip off to show he was actually human. I know Anhun says it is the sort of thing that happens in a provincial town, and Sydney, Perth, Brisbane or Melbourne are hardly those sorts of places any more. But we still are a good long way from most places in the world.

The Aborigines had their own ways of communicating among themselves, but, unlike them, we have television, newspapers, telephones etc, to warn us, if we are interested. Whilst the good people of Narrowhaven were alerted by Bern's people, and by bells and messengers etc. Without such warning systems the reception might have been very different. It also helped that the crew of the Dawn Treader and Bern's men were all armed to the teeth.


2. Have you spotted the mistake in Pauline Baynes's drawing of the parade?


Yes, Caspian walks separately with Lucy, Edmund and Eustace, but no Reepicheep. He should be at the head of the procession with Lord Bern and Drinian. Lucy, Edmund and Eustace haven't been rescued yet, not even Reepicheep. Not too many spectators either. Why are the men holding their unsheathed swords, when they also have shields to carry?

3. What do you think of Bern's plan? Is there anything you would have done differently?

Bern's plan is quite good. He is the local who understands the lie of the land and who is aware of what sort of man Gumpas is. Maybe Bern has put some thought into what he could do if anyone from Narnia really did turn up, or if his old shipmates by some chance return to the Lone Islands. Question is, what was he really doing on Felimath? Spying on Pug? Or was he fishing for news? I'm sure that would be what I would do regularly if I had been Bern. I don't think that Caspian has much choice but to agree with Bern, since he would need a bigger force to deal with Gumpas if Gumpas calls his bluff.

4. What do you think of Gumpas? How is he an effective or ineffective governor?

Gumpas doesn't seem such an effective governor, but since his Narnian overlords haven't been on the Lone Islands at least since Caspian was a boy, perhaps that explains a lot. The Calormenes are nowhere near as neglectful as Miraz has been, nor are they frightened by the sea. So Gumpas is probably glad of whatever revenue their presence brings into the Lone Islands. He also may think he is protecting his own people by permitting the slave trade on his own territory. Not only are those slaves from other islands but also he has a dandy way of getting rid of awkward people.

However, his guards seem lax and ill-disciplined. Why? Surely if he really wanted to be effective, he'd have someone drill the soldiers better and get them to look after their equipment. Or, despite the graphs, charts etc, is it really Pug who is running the show on the Lone Islands? And why has Bern got so much influence in the Lone Islands but not with Gumpas? Shouldn't Gumpas have been more wary of someone who has told him often that slavery isn't the way to go?

Perhaps the movie Gumpas, actually in league with Pug and the Calormenes, has got it right. Or is Gumpas with his long delayed appointment book really too indolent and isolated from the other Lone Islanders, and therefore too ineffectual to be in league with anyone?

5. What would you have done if you were Gumpas?

I'm sure he is owed a few favours or backhanders from quite a few people who may not want to be drawn into his disgrace. Not to mention his "bottom of the harbour" schemes. I wouldn't be in his place for all the tea in China and half the rice, but if I were the same sort of person as Gumpas, I'd track down any money I have squirrelled away and do a bunk as soon as the Dawn Treader casts off and departs for further realms. Going to Calormen sounds like a good idea. He'd know a few merchants who might help out if they weren't so annoyed at not getting their slaves.

6. How do you think Bern will compare to Gumpas as a governor? What do you think Lord Bern will be like as the new Duke?

Yes, Lord Bern will probably live happily ever after until the Dawn Treader's return at any rate. But in the long term he also needs some watching, lest he, too, gets the "can't be bothereds". He wasn't energetic enough to go east with his shipmates, finding it just as enticing to remain in the Lone Islands with his wife and children. But though he has shown he can run his own affairs competently, leading a largely demoralised Lone Islands might be a different kettle of fish. On the other hand Lord Bern is now Duke of the Lone Islands, so might have more autonomy and freedom to make his own decisions that did Gumpas. I think he will make the soldiers smarten up themselves. And he will have the measure of Pug and his men. Probably he will put them in gaol if they show their faces again anywhere in the Lone Islands.

7. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be? What does this “research” and the fact that in Lucy and Edmund’s time the Lone Islanders couldn’t tell them what was beyond the Islands tell us about the character of the Lone Islanders?

Caspian's research hasn't turned up much information. It seems the Lone Islanders don't like to go further east than where they are, and prefer to stay in touch with other nearby islanders, and the Narnians when they turn up. Did Caspian also ask the Terebinthians, the Seven Islanders and the Galmians what he might find further east? And do you find it strange that they, like the Telmarines in Prince Caspian, don't seem to be at all curious about what might lie beyond the sea?

Yes it is strange that the Lone Islanders couldn't tell Lucy and Edmund much about going east, but then it is also strange that neither Pevensie remembered how the Lone Islands became part of Narnia. It sounds like the Lone Islanders just liked to get along with their own work, and doings, shutting out the rest of the world for much of their time.

8. How would you feel if you were on sale at a slave market?

None too good, I'm afraid. They would think Eustace was a bargain compared to someone like me. The Calormenes are after workers, not underlings who talk back.
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 6696
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby Anhun » Aug 06, 2015 8:49 am

11. To me the theme of the chapter is exploitation, particularly exploitation in the name of money. It's as valid nowadays as it was 50, 100, or 1000 years ago. I've been living in America, arguably the most free country in the world, since I was 16. It is interesting that all of this freedom has not done away with the issue of exploitation. Instead it's created an open playing field in which everyone is trying to exploit everyone else. I can't discuss this issue in any more detail without getting into politics, which is taboo here.
User avatar
Anhun
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 480
Joined: Dec 29, 2010
Location: P3R-233

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Aug 09, 2015 5:26 pm

9. How would you describe Lord Bern? What are his strengths and weaknesses? If war with Calormen were to arise, do you think he would be able to handle it?

From his explanation of why he left his shipmates and stayed in the Lone Islands he seems content with what he has. Or is he? He also has had a mission to release Pug's slaves whom he has then employed usefully on his estates. This indicates strength and efficiency in managing his own affairs. But also his abandoning his shipmates might indicate a certain laziness and dependence on others, like the laziness of Lone Islanders, who tended to stay put and who let in the likes of Pug and Gumpas. By staying in the Lone Islands then wanting Caspian to stay, in case of war with Calormen, he is more inclined to worry about his immediate surroundings and doesn't have enough interest in what happened to the other six lords who travelled with him as far as the Lone Islands.

At this stage, I wonder what sort of reception did the Seven Lords get at the Lone Islands when they first arrived?

Whether Bern can convert his good values into an adequate leadership of the Lone Islands is another matter. The Lone Islands don't seem disciplined enough to cope on their own, without the previous system. One thing is that as a Duke he will have more leeway and less dependence on Caspian's presence if Calormen should want war. For now, his allegiance to Narnia will deflect attention away from the Lone Islands. But I don't think this is likely at this stage. War does come eventually, and it will be disastrous then, but the worst will fall on Narnia, when those merchants buying slaves are warriors in disguise, looking for a way of taking over that entire world.

10. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be?

Not very. Only one person even mentions Aslan's country. Nobody knows what lays beyond the Lone Islands, and that suggests the Lone Islands are not as sea-faring as Pug or the other places Caspian has visited. They also seem scared of going too far away from their homes. Surely the Lone Islanders would have fishermen, who are blown off course? What will be useful is that he does learn about prevailing winds and currents. Do you think Drinian and the other sailors would have asked more useful questions, than would Caspian?

11. What theme or themes do you see in this chapter and how do you rate there validity and importance?

Anhun wrote:11. To me the theme of the chapter is exploitation, particularly exploitation in the name of money. It's as valid nowadays as it was 50, 100, or 1000 years ago.


True. But you can't have exploitation without firstly greed, a disinclination to satisfy that greed by one's own efforts, and envy of what others might have. Exploitation is the unfair use of others' efforts, money and well-being, after all. Lone Island, Calormen, and Pug all need to live by trade, but what is going on seems to be an unfair trade. What Gumpas might claim he was trying to do was to find an easy way to ensure prosperity and progress for his people, but it was in a morally corrupt fashion, by preying on strangers. If they avoided sending tribute to Narnia, what did they do with the money they were supposed to collect?

Caspian lists a lot of things that are worth having, including cabbages, beer and books. Crops of one kind or another and vegetables can be produced on the fertile grassland of Felimath. And people who have boats surely could at least fish. Lucy mentioned sheep grazing on Felimath, but where did they go to? Money, in itself, is only a means of transmission, and a measure of value, useful to enable the energetic to get things done. Lone Islanders only need money as a means of trading with outsiders to get anything they lack, themselves, such as seed or stock, so they can grow food or breed livestock. Or to build more ships. Instead, they get Terebinthians and Galmians whom they can sell off to Calormenes merchants. To pay for the industry that doesn't seem to be happening on the Lone Islands?

Thus laziness is also a major recurring theme in this chapter. The Calormenes want workers, and items of interest. They don't want a complainer like Eustace who expected to be a coddled passenger on the Dawn Treader, not a captive in a prison hulk. Envy and Lust are also themes. People desiring things that others have but are too lazy to work for, themselves. Eustace previously trying to disparage the Dawn Treader by comparison with the sort of ship his cousin Susan would have sailed in. Eustace expecting a pleasure cruise when he wouldn't have the means of paying for one anyway.
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 6696
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby Anhun » Aug 11, 2015 2:19 am

waggawerewolf27 wrote:Envy and Lust are also themes.


To paraphrase Tina Turner, what's lust got to do with it? Or envy for that matter? While greed and economic exploitation go hand in hand, you don't have to be jealous of someone else in order to want things for yourself. I'm not sure about this chapter showing laziness on the part of Eustace, although other parts of the book do. Not wanting to be a slave doesn't make one lazy. I suppose you can infer that the Calormenes are lazy from the fact that they want slaves, but I think the most obvious example of laziness is Governor Gumpas and his soldiers. They are clearly just as happy to pull a paycheck for doing nothing.
User avatar
Anhun
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 480
Joined: Dec 29, 2010
Location: P3R-233

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Aug 11, 2015 3:30 pm

@Anhun: Another word for lust is desire. Or to want things. Lust is the usual word used, but it isn't restricted to Tina Turner/pop culture or romance. Admittedly, Bern lost his desire to travel further when he settled down with his Lone Islander wife, and he was clearly far too comfortable in the Lone Islands, to desire to return to Narnia, though possibly he could have done so, even before Caspian's arrival. A lust for power is another example of using the word.

But I didn't think Gumpas' desire to depend on Calormene-style progress was necessarily an important theme, whatever enviousness inspired it. Or even Eustace's grizzling about how much worse off he was than everyone else in the same boat, and blaming Caspian for not getting them out of their predicament a lot sooner, because he was too busy enjoying himself.

Not wanting to be exploited as a slave is natural enough, as you say. But being considered too out of condition, and too unpleasant and uncooperative even to be sold as a slave, might lead to an even worse fate, which Eustace might find a lot more frightening, since Pug is only interested in profit. Would other fishermen find useful "the fish that John West rejects"? (John West is a brand of canned tuna or salmon which uses that advertisement). I agree that it was the laziness of Gumpas and his soldiers that was the most striking feature of this chapter. But C.S.Lewis in this chapter is also preparing for Eustace's thoughts and behaviour in the next two chapters where Eustace's own underlying laziness might have further consequences, besides being considered too useless for the slave market.
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 6696
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby Anhun » Aug 13, 2015 5:43 am

waggawerewolf27 wrote:@Anhun: Another word for lust is desire. Or to want things.


This definition of lust makes it a synonym for greed. So it would definitely be a theme, but it's redundant to mention one, having already mentioned the other.

But I didn't think Gumpas' desire to depend on Calormene-style progress was necessarily an important theme, whatever enviousness inspired it.


There's no indication that Gumpas is motivated by envy versus simple greed.

Or even Eustace's grizzling about how much worse off he was than everyone else in the same boat, and blaming Caspian for not getting them out of their predicament a lot sooner, because he was too busy enjoying himself.


This is part of a repeating theme of Eustace's immaturity and tendency to blame his problems on everyone but himself. Not that he was to blame for being kidnapped, but it wasn't some sort of a conspiracy between everyone else on the planet. In fact, his comparisons between his own situation and the others are really just an excuse for him to be so much whinier.
User avatar
Anhun
NarniaWeb Nut
 
Posts: 480
Joined: Dec 29, 2010
Location: P3R-233

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Aug 13, 2015 5:14 pm

Anhun wrote:This definition of lust makes it a synonym for greed. So it would definitely be a theme, but it's redundant to mention one, having already mentioned the other.


No it wouldn't. Desire basically refers to things you'd like to acquire. The term lust, or luxuria in Latin, seems to suggest wrongfully desiring what or who you don't have, or what isn't really necessary for you to have, the most obvious being for luxuries, including the exploitation of someone else (eg servants, and slaves, as well as sexual exploitation - sex without love). Which is where your exploitation does truly come in. And where it is ever so applicable to this chapter of VDT. I daresay that desire did come into Bern's turning from his journey to marry a Lone Islander girl, and that he did fancy her, to use a softer term for sexual desire, but there is no suggestion that in doing so he treated his wife wrongfully.

Greed tends to refer to getting more of what you already have. It is greedy to ask for a second helping of something you enjoy when there is only enough to go round the present company, I suppose. Or not sharing what you have with other people. I tend to think of men who want to marry more than one woman as being plain greedy, for instance, however their religion might permit it, and may their mothers-in-law be the sorts that make them pay for it, too. :ymdevil:

I believe it has been argued that greed (or avaritia, in Latin) also explains all others of the seven deadly sins, such as lust (luxuria), envy (invidia), anger (ira), pride (superbia), and gluttony (gula). Sloth (acedia), maybe a greed for more leisure, doesn't merely refer to physical laziness, but also spiritual laziness, and the failure to do things that should have been done.

There's no indication that Gumpas is motivated by envy versus simple greed.


So if envy doesn't play any part in Gumpas' failure to meet up with his councillors more often, the slackness of his army and the non-payment of tribute to Narnia, why is he still where he is? Why didn't he simply give up and let Pug or someone else take over? Or was he just having too much fun with his graphs, statistics etc.? Why doesn't he simply admit he can't do the job and hand in his long overdue resignation? Is it because he likes his own salary too much? I presume he still gets one, a governor being a paid position, unlike the title of Duke. Or isn't his salary enough to compete with other, less lazy, Lone Islanders, such as the councillors he doesn't meet as often as he should?

This is part of a repeating theme of Eustace's immaturity and tendency to blame his problems on everyone but himself. Not that he was to blame for being kidnapped, but it wasn't some sort of a conspiracy between everyone else on the planet. In fact, his comparisons between his own situation and the others are really just an excuse for him to be so much whinier.


Maybe. Eustace does whine a lot, being immature etc. A good example of the failure to grow spiritually. But, in whining and whingeing, he does make invidious, or envious, comparisons between himself and Lucy, because of her getting a whole cabin to herself, and to Caspian, forgetting that before they met Lord Bern, he, too, was in the same boat. I'd agree it was hardly his fault that he got into Narnia, but his failure, so far, to see that there was no conspiracy against him, does give him some seeming justification to believe he is worse off than he really is.
User avatar
waggawerewolf27
NarniaWeb Zealot
 
Posts: 6696
Joined: Sep 25, 2009
Location: Oz
Gender: Female

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby Pattertwigs Pal » Jul 22, 2016 7:44 pm

1. Do you think Lewis's description on how the townspeople reacted to the procession is accurate to real life? Why or Why not?
Yes, I do think it is pretty accurate. People often get excited by royalty especially if they don’t have a king themselves. (Many people in the U.S.A. seem to be fascinated by British royalty.) Children are excited by parades and events that are not part of their normal routine. Students are very eager to get out of their lessons. Young women are known to get excited by handsome men. They often get that way around popular singers for example.

2. Have you spotted the mistake in Pauline Baynes's drawing of the parade?
No, my version doesn’t seem to have that picture (based on what others have said). It might be in another copy I have but it has been a while since I looked at that one.

3. What do you think of Bern's plan? Is there anything you would have done differently?
I think it was a very good plan. Fighting could have easily gone very wrong. This way they had a chance. They got the townspeople excited about them and that could be helpful in swaying Gumpas.

4. What do you think of Gumpas? How is he an effective or ineffective governor?
He is greedy and heavily rule oriented. He cares more about if the islands are doing well economically than morally. He is effective in that he seems to have procedures in place for running the government. He is ineffective because he doesn’t care about people. He is more interested in economics, committees, rules and regulations than people. He can handle the routine, but when the unexpected happens he is ill-equipped to handle it. He seems unwilling to believe that Caspian is the king because there wasn’t a paper trail to support a visit from the king. If the state of his guards (and their armor) is any indication, he either is better at dealing with paperwork or doesn’t care about how the army is run.

5. What would you have done if you were Gumpas?
I have a hard time imaging myself as Gumpas. I think I would have been nice to Caspian and tried to get on his good side.

6. How do you think Bern will compare to Gumpas as a governor? What do you think Lord Bern will be like as the new Duke?
Bern is a smart man. He can come up with viable plans in tight situations. He will definitely consider the human aspect. While Gumpas is smart in his own way, he doesn’t have the skills Bern does in creative thinking. He is also not interested in people. Bern seems to be good at running his fief. He seems to have the support of a considerable amount people since he was able to have a “considerable” crowd gathered when Caspian landed. He will care about the people. Bern seems unsure if he will be up to handling big events such as war with Calormen. That would make me a bit nervous if he were my duke. (It is interesting to note that it seems endearing and a sign of a good leader when Caspian tells Aslan, he (Caspian) does not feel he is ready to rule. Maybe because of the age difference?) Overall, I think he will be a good fit. He is able to predict events that might happen. Gumpas couldn’t do that.

7. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be? What does this “research” and the fact that in Lucy and Edmund’s time the Lone Islanders couldn’t tell them what was beyond the Islands tell us about the character of the Lone Islanders?
Not very, the Lone Islanders seem to not know much and the little they do know is not specific enough. They are not an adventurous type of people. They weren’t in Lucy and Edmund’s time and they still aren’t in Caspian’s time. They also do not seem to be curious about what is to the East of them.

8. How would you feel if you were on sale at a slave market?
I would be scared and angry. I think I would also be quite upset if no one was interested in buying me.

9. How would you describe Lord Bern? What are his strengths and weaknesses? If war with Calormen were to arise, do you think he would be able to handle it?
He is good at planning and cares about people. He can think on his feet.
He does seem a bit weak in the area of taking risks. He was the first lord to leave the voyage. He could maybe be a little more confident in his abilities. I would worry about Bern handling war since he seems so nervous about it. I do think that if he did end up facing war he could handle it. He would be good at the strategy part, but I’m not sure how he would do leading an army.

10. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be?
Oops duplicate.

11. What theme or themes do you see in this chapter and how do you rate there validity and importance?
Anti-slavery – very valid and important, and words can be very powerful – this is important because so often people use violence to make their points. There also are jabs against bureaucracy. Too much red-tape, forms, and paperwork is all to common.
Image
Silver Chair Reading Group
NW sister to Movie Aristotle & daughter of the King
User avatar
Pattertwigs Pal
Moderator
Cookie Queen of NarniaWeb
 
Posts: 4947
Joined: May 16, 2009
Location: U.S.A.
Gender: Female

Re: Chapter 4 - What Caspian Did there

Postby aileth » Jul 31, 2016 11:25 pm

1. Do you think Lewis's description on how the townspeople reacted to the procession is accurate to real life? Why or Why not?
While there may have been other motivations, his descriptions of their reasons for turning out seem consistent. For instance, as a kid I counted as a boon anything that would distract from schoolwork, even if it was just a car turning into the driveway.

2. Have you spotted the mistake in Pauline Baynes's drawing of the parade?
Yes, but I hadn't noticed it until it was pointed out.

3. What do you think of Bern's plan? Is there anything you would have done differently?
It certainly worked well. Bern seemed to have extensive knowledge of the reasons why people did things. Do you think he made a practice of people-watching? The latter question is a rather sad one to have to answer, as I am neither a brilliant tactician nor strategist extraordinaire. I can't even win playing Risk!

4. What do you think of Gumpas? How is he an effective or ineffective governor?
As a handler of bureaucratic niceties, I think he was quite effective; he had laid out so many difficulties to achieving anything productive, that it seemed that no one tried anymore. Saved him a lot of bother. As a truly good governor, not so much. Would you have wanted him in charge if war or disease or other troubles came to the islands?

5. What would you have done if you were Gumpas?
I like your take on that, wagga. If I were a schemer like Gumpas, I think I would have tried to smooth things over also. But Bern kept the action moving fast enough that Gumpas didn't have time to think. And though he might have called on his troops to assist him, what chance would they have, seeing the poor condition they were in?

6. How do you think Bern will compare to Gumpas as a governor? What do you think Lord Bern will be like as the new Duke?
Bern doesn't seem to be anti-progress, as Gumpas accuses him of being; he had a different idea of what would be considered progress, that's all. Bern seems to be a just and upright man, and wouldn't be likely to put up with nonsense from anyone. That might be a welcome change to a good number of the Islanders.

7. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be? What does this “research” and the fact that in Lucy and Edmund’s time the Lone Islanders couldn’t tell them what was beyond the Islands tell us about the character of the Lone Islanders?
Probably about as helpful as the mediaeval tales that floated about regarding the Atlantic and all the sea monsters. The Islanders must have been a contented crowd: a trifle stodgy, perhaps somewhat insular, and singularly lacking in wanderlust. I mean, how many thousand years had it been? Unless they got adventurous in the middle somewhere, and forgot to write it down (or a wicked librarian discarded the account.)

8. How would you feel if you were on sale at a slave market?
A wee tad nervous, perhaps? Slavery has been around since the beginning of history; it holds true today as it did then, that your comfort and even survival would depend upon the character of the one who bought you.

9. How would you describe Lord Bern? What are his strengths and weaknesses? If war with Calormen were to arise, do you think he would be able to handle it?
At first glance, maybe not. He does seem to take the easy way, the line of least resistance in some regards, yet he is perfectly capable of standing for what is right when necessary. As soon as he had been vested with the King's authority, he began to take a more active part in suppressing that which he only condemned before. He wouldn't stand about waffling, should the Calormenes attack. The arrival of Caspian had wakened him, and brought about a change.

10. How useful do you think Caspian's "research" about the Eastern Sea will be?
Let me modify what I said about the Islanders above, after re-reading that section. They apparently did sail East, just not far enough to find land. When you consider that, in the next chapter, they sailed for at least a month, it's small wonder that the sea captains didn't find it.

11. What theme or themes do you see in this chapter and how do you rate their validity and importance?
Not so much a theme, but something that struck me: there was no retaliation by Bern or Caspian against either Pug or Gumpas. Sure, Pug had to restore that day's money, and Gumpas lost his post and residence; however, neither of them was thrown into prison, sold as slaves, or any other suitable punishment. I imagine that they would have had to seek other employment elsewhere, but it would seem to have been a voluntary exile.
Now my days are swifter than a post: they flee away ... my days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle
User avatar
aileth
NarniaWeb Junkie
Peripatetic powder-room sub
 
Posts: 539
Joined: Jan 02, 2014
Location: Western Canada
Gender: Female


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest