Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

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Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby Pattertwigs Pal » Jul 08, 2015 4:00 am

1. Once again we find that time flows differently in Narnia than on Earth. How does this affect Edmund, Lucy, and Caspian? How do you think you would handle the situation?

2. Caspian's quest is to find his father's old friends. What about this quest is noble and honorable? How do you think this quest will turn out?

3. In Prince Caspian the trees were asleep and had been sleeping for quite some time. When do you think the Dryad sang to Reepicheep? Why did the Dryad sing to Reepicheep and not any other Narnians?

4. Reepicheep has a longing in his heart from when he was a young mouse. Have you ever had a longing like this? What was it? Do you think Reepicheep will find the object of his desire?

5. What do you think of the way in which Drinian and Caspian talk about the events on Galma?

6. In LWW, Lewis hints that Edmund's character might have been restored in part by Lucy's cordial. Why do you think it doesn't seem to change Eustace's disposition?

7. Why do you think Lewis writes, "Of course Caspian's ship was not that horrible thing, a galley rowed by slaves. ... and everyone ... had often taken a turn"?

8. Why do you think Lewis included the aside that Lucy feeds the chickens?

9. What do you make of Eustace's journal? How does it serve the story?

10. Reepicheep's chivalry clashes with Eustace's modern sensibilities in this chapter. Whose perspective do you think is correct in regards to fighting? Why?

11. What do you think Edmund means when he says it only makes Eustace worse if you try to be nice to him?

12. This chapter has a lot of description, both of the boat and situations. Which one stands out the most to you and why?
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Re: Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby King_Erlian » Jul 09, 2015 3:07 am

1. Once again we find that time flows differently in Narnia than on Earth. How does this affect Edmund, Lucy, and Caspian? How do you think you would handle the situation?
For Edmund and Lucy, this was the second time they'd experienced this. The last time, centuries had passed, and so it would have been quite reasonable for them to think that after another year had passed in England, a similar number of centuries would have passed in Narnia. So it would have been a pleasant surprise for them to meet people that they'd met on their last trip, only a few years older.

For Caspian, this was the first time he'd experienced the phenomenon. I think he'd expected never to see the Pevensies again, so it would have been quite a shock for him - and the fact that they hadn't aged as much as he had.

2. Caspian's quest is to find his father's old friends. What about this quest is noble and honorable? How do you think this quest will turn out?
I think Caspian wants to honour his father most of all. I imagine that, as none of the Lords ever returned, he doesn't expect to find any of them alive, but finding out what happened to them is part of allowing his father's spirit to be at peace, perhaps. Since the journey is planned to take a year and a day, that means that after six months (and twelve hours - there's a thought: are there twenty-four hours in a Narnian day?) they will have to turn around and head back, no matter how much success they've had; and they have no idea how much world there is out there beyond the Lone Islands.

3. In Prince Caspian the trees were asleep and had been sleeping for quite some time. When do you think the Dryad sang to Reepicheep? Why did the Dryad sing to Reepicheep and not any other Narnians?
To be honest, I think this is a slip-up on Lewis' part - if the Dryads were asleep when Reepicheep was young, there's no way one could have sung to him. I think the only way it could have happened would be in a dream, which, given the prophetic nature of it, must have come from Aslan.

4. Reepicheep has a longing in his heart from when he was a young mouse. Have you ever had a longing like this? What was it? Do you think Reepicheep will find the object of his desire?
This may sound silly, but since I was about ten or eleven I wanted to have a song I'd written get into the charts. I've written getting on for two hundred songs so far, but never had one published. Being a Christian doesn't help - secular record labels won't touch them and Christian labels (at least in the UK) are only interested in the kind of praise and worship songs that can be sung by large congregations, i.e. musically predictable and full of stock Christian cliches. But I digress.

As for Reepicheep, if the longing in his heart had been inspired by a prophetic dream sent by Aslan, then I think the chances of success are pretty certain!

5. What do you think of the way in which Drinian and Caspian talk about the events on Galma?
I can imagine that Caspian found himself in a potentially embarrassing situation in which the possibility of his marrying the Duke's daughter was raised, and Drinian found it very funny. It shows what great friends they've become that Drinian dares show his amusement - if it had been Miraz and he'd so much as smiled, he would have been beheaded on the spot.

6. In LWW, Lewis hints that Edmund's character might have been restored in part by Lucy's cordial. Why do you think it doesn't seem to change Eustace's disposition?
Edmund had already turned away from the Witch and apologised to the other three, so he had the desire to change and become better. Eustace hadn't experienced anything in Narnia so far apart from a soaking, the fright of his life encountering all sorts of mythical non-human talking creatures, and sea-sickness, so it's not surprising he wasn't in the mood to embrace any change the cordial might have offered him.

7. Why do you think Lewis writes, "Of course Caspian's ship was not that horrible thing, a galley rowed by slaves. ... and everyone ... had often taken a turn"?
I think Lewis is establishing that Caspian was a fair, just and kind monarch who treated his subjects with respect. It puts me in mind of the gondoliers who become kings in Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Gondoliers", who establish "a monarchy that's tempered with republican equality".

8. Why do you think Lewis included the aside that Lucy feeds the chickens?
Lucy is a very practical person and wants to help in practical ways; she's not content to just sit there and wallow in being a Queen of Narnia.

9. What do you make of Eustace's journal? How does it serve the story?
It shows how he sees events, and how his memory is selective - for instance, he says "It's a good thing I'm not seasick", forgetting that he was. He also hasn't grasped yet that he is in a different world, where powered ships and aeroplanes don't exist, and there's no British Consul. The Pevensies realised that Narnia was another world very quickly; Eustace is so set in his belief that there are no other worlds that he can't yet accept it.

He's also quite paranoid, thinking that everyone's against him and that everything that happens is all about trying to make him miserable. Given what we learn about Experiment House in The Silver Chair, and the way that he must have been bullied and the only way he knew how to cope with it was to suck up to the bullies, I think that's understandable. Underneath it all, he was very frightened and powerless. To make himself feel stronger he refers to "ordinary people" and marks himself and his parents as different, and by implication, better. I can sympathise with him because that's exactly what I was like when I was his age, except that I never (well, hardly ever) sucked up to the bullies and I didn't try to make other people's lives a misery (well, maybe occasionally). But I certainly did go around saying "I got such-and-such a mark"!

10. Reepicheep's chivalry clashes with Eustace's modern sensibilities in this chapter. Whose perspective do you think is correct in regards to fighting? Why?
I think, to be fair to Eustace, his views are quite understandable given that he was living (or had just lived, depending on your view of the timeline) through a horrific war with Nazi Germany that had claimed millions of lives, both military and civilian. For Reepicheep, on the other hand, the war with the Telmarines (not counting the years of living in hiding) had been a relatively short affair, culminating in a single battle and consisting for the most part of hand-to-hand fighting. Reepicheep sees sword-fighting as much as a sport as a part of warfare, but there's nothing sporting in wondering if your house in Cambridge is going to get bombed to bits today. So, from the perspective of their respective worlds, they're both right.

11. What do you think Edmund means when he says it only makes Eustace worse if you try to be nice to him?
As Eustace is so paranoid, he thinks that any contact anyone tries to make with him is an attempt to hurt or humiliate him, so he lashes out in response.

12. This chapter has a lot of description, both of the boat and situations. Which one stands out the most to you and why?
When I read the book when I was young, I didn't really take much of this description in. Now, I have a clearer idea of what the Dawn Treader looks like, and I think the Walden film got the look pretty much right. The thing that struck me the most is that the Dawn Treader was quite a compact ship, with every nook and cranny used to store goods (and people!). Almost like being in an Ikea bedroom. :-)
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Re: Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jul 11, 2015 5:23 am

1. Once again we find that time flows differently in Narnia than on Earth. How does this affect Edmund, Lucy, and Caspian? How do you think you would handle the situation?

I'd think that I'd be delighted to meet an old friend so unexpectedly, though maybe not in such a dramatic fashion. And so am not surprised that all three agree with me in the book. And this time when they enter Narnia not so much time has elapsed, though Caspian seems quite grown up. But this is a section that gets a bit confusing for the reader delving deeply into the story. The trouble is all three, whether one year, two years or three years have elapsed, are all at an age where emotions change rapidly as individuals grow. It is not a time of life I remember with pleasure, and I'm not sure I could handle these situations any better than they do in the book, even though now I have the benefit of hindsight.

Three years have gone by since Lucy and Edmund last saw Caspian in Narnia, after the second battle of Beruna. That would make him about 17 years of age, if he was 14 years in PC, that is to say, the same age as Peter was. After the first chapter of VDT we are a bit hazy about exactly how much time has passed for Lucy and Edmund. In Prince Caspian they were off to boarding school after the end of the summer holidays, a good year later than LWW. And the events of VDT are in the following summer, almost another year later. But it could be a longer period of time, depending on when they had Eustace to stay with them. Their older brother, about 15 or 16 at least, is studying hard for what is at least a school leaving certificate, or maybe a college or university entry exam, necessary to determine his future. That is, if the war is less intense, or even over, and depending what he wants to do with his life. Their sister Susan seems old enough to stay with her parents in USA for 10 more weeks, instead of going back to school at the end of the holidays, unlike Lucy and Edmund. Peter was the same age as Caspian previously. Does Caspian seem the same age as Peter now? Should we be glad that the older Pevensies are not around? Or should we be sorry?

How does Edmund, who in "Prince Caspian" saw his own brother as an equal, see both Peter and Caspian now? And now that Caspian has grown up, how is he going to see Edmund? As Peter's younger brother, or as an equal to himself? Then there is Lucy. She is happy to see Caspian, but she, herself, is becoming a bit more aware of herself as an older girl. And normally Lucy is closer to Peter than she is to her other siblings. It is fine enough at first when Caspian has just pulled them out of the water, but what about later? What is going to be trickier is Eustace's presence on board.

2. Caspian's quest is to find his father's old friends. What about this quest is noble and honorable? How do you think this quest will turn out?

Caspian's quest is a fulfilment of a pledge he made to Aslan to seek out his father's friends. And of course keeping one's word is noble and honorable. In fact since he made the promise at his coronation, it could be considered official business. I'm not sure all his new Telmarine subjects would see it that way, even though he was honouring also the memory of his father whom they may have respected more than Miraz. But it seems that Narnia is at peace and good order, and Caspian has appointed good loyal deputies in Doctor Cornelius and Trumpkin to keep things going well. In the real world, a similar sovereign, or the heirs to a throne, for that matter, might be accused of just nicking off for a year's holiday. Or satisfying his own selfish urges to explore the world, however the trip might be justified as official duties. But I agree that Caspian, unlike Miraz, also tries to lead by example. And that he has a powerful friend, Aslan, to protect him in this mission. It doesn't mean to say that Caspian will find his mission easy at all.

3. In Prince Caspian the trees were asleep and had been sleeping for quite some time. When do you think the Dryad sang to Reepicheep? Why did the Dryad sing to Reepicheep and not any other Narnians?

How do we know that all the Dryads all went to sleep all together and for hundreds of years? Do we really know if they didn't sing to other Narnians? And wouldn't even Dryads, intelligent beings in Narnia, know to post sentries, and to change them around? In Prince CAspian are we told more than the fact that the Dryads went to sleep? Or what sort of sleep?

Obviously they, like the Old Narnians, did lay low. They went underground, went back to their roots. Maybe they hibernated, or aestivated. But there are levels of sleep and hibernating and aestivating animals do get restless or partly wake up. In any case they were only sleeping, or dozing, maybe talking in their sleep, singing in their dreams, or even sleepwalking, nothing more. Maybe they had to wake up to some extent every now and then for their own good. Or were disturbed by crying babies of one kind or another, especially in the spring. Lulling a small mouseling to sleep would probably send them back to sleep themselves.

Reepicheep seems a rather romantic little mouse, not in the chic flick sense but in the gallantry and derring do sense. Other old Narnians - Trumpkin does come to mind - would be far more practical and would soon forget any songs sung to them.

4. Reepicheep has a longing in his heart from when he was a young mouse. Have you ever had a longing like this? What was it? Do you think Reepicheep will find the object of his desire?

I agree that Reepicheep has a longing in his heart, and that he will find the object of his desire, but only at the right time and place. I did have a longing to travel one day, and yes I did get to do some travelling. But I think that Reepicheep's yearnings are more mystical and idealistic than my itchy feet, and I also have a longing to be in a place I can call home.

5. What do you think of the way in which Drinian and Caspian talk about the events on Galma?

I don't like it, really. Even though as King_Erlian points out, that it illustrates how well Drinian and Caspian seem to work together. They were treated to considerable hospitality, and now they sound like a pair of sniggering schoolboys because of the intentions behind the hospitality. Obviously finding a wife would be another, secondary, sort of aim Caspian might have, and he seems to be lucky enough to be what would be called "a good catch". He has to think about the succession if he survives the journey, and an agreeable consort would assuage the loneliness he did feel in his heart in PC. But is he ready for marriage right now, anyway? And is "good looks" the only criterion one looks for in a future spouse?

6. In LWW, Lewis hints that Edmund's character might have been restored in part by Lucy's cordial. Why do you think it doesn't seem to change Eustace's disposition?

I don't see Edmund's character being restored in part by Lucy's cordial, in LWW, since he would never have been in the near fatal situation he was in, when healed by Lucy's cordial, if his character had not at least started to change, a result from the near fatal situation when he was rescued from the White Witch and when he had that little chat with Aslan. I'm tempted to see Edmund as doomed to die anyway, at some point in the series, since in LWW alone, his life was forfeit, so that Aslan had to die for him, to allow him to survive longer. Whereas, in Eustace's case, apart from seasickness and panicking in the sea, he was in no such position of understanding and gratitude. But I do think that the cordial might mark out how Reepicheep and Eustace eventually became friends.

7. Why do you think Lewis writes, "Of course Caspian's ship was not that horrible thing, a galley rowed by slaves. ... and everyone ... had often taken a turn"?

Because in the real world so many of those galleys, even the later Viking long boats with the dragon prows, were often, even usually, rowed by slaves or prisoners when sails weren't effective enough in making progress. Caspian isn't in the real world and so he is more like some of history's good kings.

8. Why do you think Lewis included the aside that Lucy feeds the chickens?

Lucy is being treated as a lady, but that doesn't mean she hasn't got a desire to be helpful and co-operative. Feeding the chickens is something she can do to be useful, and free up others to do work she might not be able to do, or where she would be in the way without a lot of training.

9. What do you make of Eustace's journal? How does it serve the story?

It is a good way of showing his attitude to the ship and to others on it, and how his attitude conflicts with the actual situation on board ship. It is clear he sees everything negatively, doesn't trust anyone, and definitely resents finding himself on board the Dawn Treader, which is certainly not set up to be the large pleasure cruiser that Eustace might prefer being a guest of. He sees himself as a captive and kidnapped, after all. But I wonder if he, too, might be also a little envious of his cousin Susan going to USA, and comparing his lot with what he imagines Susan might be getting on her journey to USA?
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Re: Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby Anhun » Jul 12, 2015 3:07 pm

1. After the shock that Lucy and Edmund had returning to Narnia after centuries had past and most of their old friends were dead, I imagine it would be a delightful treat to come back and find Caspian older, but still a young man. I really liked this scene in the Walden movie. Lucy's look of joy when she sees Caspian in the water was perfect for her affectionate character and the surprising situation. As for Caspian, he probably thinks of the Lucy and Edmund as being more or less ageless. He was already familiar with the fact that they don't seem to age much even when a long time passes in Narnia.

3. How do we know the dryad didn't sing the song to anyone else?

8. I imagine Lucy as being a hands on, practical sort of Queen, who would do anything to help her subjects.

10. I agree with what Erlian said about Reepicheep's eagerness for swordplay being a sort of sportsmanship. But Eustace's so called pacifism is hypocritical. I would define what he did to Reepicheep a moment earlier as an act of aggression. If you don't agree, think how you would feel if someone came up to you while you were in the middle of a conversation and started swinging you by the hair.
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Re: Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby waggawerewolf27 » Jul 13, 2015 5:10 pm

10. Reepicheep's chivalry clashes with Eustace's modern sensibilities in this chapter. Whose perspective do you think is correct in regards to fighting? Why?

Now isn't this a most carefully worded question that appears as much as possible to be unbiased against either side! ;)) Frankly though, unlike Erlian's commendable attempts to be fair to the lad, due to recent experience of WW2, it is difficult for me not to take sides - against Eustace. Unfortunately, Eustace confuses pacifism with passivity, and doesn't understand that his own aggression towards Reepicheep excuses Reepicheep's self-defensive attack on Eustace.

Reepicheep has every right to defend his person, and his self-respect, and he knows it. It is called assertiveness, though Reepicheep is in danger of getting too carried away with his skill in swordmanship. His angry reaction does include reminding Eustace and anyone else playing fast and loose with Reepicheep's tail that his lack of inches would not excuse their being on the wrong side of Reepicheep's understandable wrath in a fair fight. Yes it might be a game as has been said. But unlike Eustace, who hasn't learned much from WW2, he does also realise that appeasing a bully would get him nowhere.

But Eustace's passive-aggressive behaviour, including his eventual, most reluctant apology, is about as "pacific" as a prisoner of war outwardly complying with orders, whilst plotting his eventual escape from the enemy to rejoin his own side. At least Reepicheep didn't damage Eustace unduly. Unlike the response from larger and less reasonable animals, even when the person who appears to be manhandling them is really trying to help them, eg giving necessary medication to a cat or a small child.

11. What do you think Edmund means when he says it only makes Eustace worse if you try to be nice to him?

Basically, Eustace is too hostile and paranoid to respond to people's efforts to be nice, to try to be nice in return. All that he has learned from the books he has read hasn't been on how to behave towards others and interact with them. It is about "fat foreign children doing exercises" and how much grain there is in silos. That is, he has been reading what the governments of those "fat foreign children" wanted him to see. How much of what was happening around him in UK did he really notice? Or maybe he was still too young during WW2 to understand what was going on? And we don't know from the book exactly where he lived.

The movie put Eustace's home in Cambridge which makes a lot of sense, after C.S.Lewis went from Oxford to Cambridge. But both Oxford and Cambridge were relatively little affected by the bombing which was targeted at London, itself, and industrial cities like Liverpool, Manchester, Coventry, Glasgow and Edinburgh. Besides, Hitler wanted to make Oxford the capital of a conquered UK, according to Sheila, the tour guide who showed Oxford to us.

12. This chapter has a lot of description, both of the boat and situations. Which one stands out the most to you and why?

The description of the Dawn Treader, itself, is particularly interesting, as I've seen the set for the Dawn Treader in the film. But as it was mounted on a gymbal, its full spendour as in the book's description was never shown. Don't forget that the size of the Dawn Treader designed for the film had the same dimensions as the original Endeavour, that Captain Cook sailed from England to reach Australia in 1770, possibly a realistic comparison. The bit that strikes me most is the description of Lucy's cabin, which, even Eustace admitted, had particularly beautiful craftsmanship. Also, Caspian's careful refusal to share Drinian's cabin, so as not to impose on Drinian's responsibilities as the captain.

The most important bit, though, was the separate cabin Eustace was to share with Edmund and Caspian, whilst the other men had to share the rest of the hold just like most ships. At least Eustace got a proper bunk, instead of sleeping in a hammock. But basically, he thinks he should have been lodged in Lucy's cabin. Why does he resent Edmund, in particular, so much?
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Re: Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby Glumpuddle » Mar 11, 2016 8:39 pm

9. What do you make of Eustace's journal? How does it serve the story?

Loooove the journal. First off, it's a much more interesting way to summarize long stretches of the voyage then just narration. Second, it lets us get deep inside Eustace' point-of-view for a while. So, by the time we reach the next island, we feel like we know Eustace pretty well. I would not say Eustace becomes more sympathetic... but I might say he becomes a little less annoying to me as a reader because he isn't so one-dimensional anymore. I get to see why he acts the way he does.
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Re: Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby Pattertwigs Pal » Jul 01, 2016 8:12 pm

1. Once again we find that time flows differently in Narnia than on Earth. How does this affect Edmund, Lucy, and Caspian? How do you think you would handle the situation?
It really doesn’t seem to have much of an effect on them. Once they clarify the time, they don’t seem to give it another thought. Caspian was older than Lucy and Edmund the last time they met and he is still older than them now so their age order is the same. I think it would be much more awkward for them if the order had changed. It probably helps some that they are all royalty and thus act in a similar manner. Also Lucy and Edmund have been Caspian’s age and older so maybe that helps them relate somehow? (According to the ages on the character site, Caspian is 16, Lucy is 10, Edmund is 12, and Eustace is 9). Caspian is still closer to a boy than a man, and Edmund, especially in Narnia, is mature for his age. Those conditions make it easier for them to relate as equals despite the 4 year difference.
I would like find it awkward and be uncomfortable for a while until I had time to adjust.
2. Caspian's quest is to find his father's old friends. What about this quest is noble and honorable? How do you think this quest will turn out?
Caspian is trying to right a wrong and is going about it in the right way – with Aslan’s approval.
It has Aslan’s approval so it is unlikely it will end in disaster.
3. In Prince Caspian the trees were asleep and had been sleeping for quite some time. When do you think the Dryad sang to Reepicheep? Why did the Dryad sing to Reepicheep and not any other Narnians?
I do not know how long Narnian mice live, but it is very unlikely that Reepicheep was alive before the Telemarines invaded Narnia. Thus, the Dryad must have sung to Reepicheep during the time the trees were “asleep.” We hear slightly differing accounts as to what is going one with the trees. Doctor Cornelius says “It is you Telmarines who silenced […] the trees […].” and “You can gather learned magicians and try to find a way of awakening the Trees once more.” When Caspian is escaping through the woods, it states “[…]though he himself might be unlike other Telmarines, the trees could not be expected to know this. Nor did they.” Trufflehunter says, “Since the Humans came into the land, felling forests and defiling streams, the Dryads and Naiads have sunk into a deep sleep.” I think that to some degree the trees are aware of their surroundings even if they are asleep. If that were not the case, they would not have given Caspian such a hard time. Maybe a dryad had a dream / vision while in a deep sleep and awoke to sing to Reepicheep.

Reepicheep was the one who needed to hear it. I believe Aslan was behind it since he knew what Reepicheep would grow up to be. Off the top of my head, I can’t think of another character that would be as suited to having the “spell of it … on [him] all [his] life.”

4. Reepicheep has a longing in his heart from when he was a young mouse. Have you ever had a longing like this? What was it? Do you think Reepicheep will find the object of his desire?
I have had and do have longings, but I do not feel that they are longings of the same degree and kind of as Reepicheep’s longing. Reepicheep’s longing seems nobler than mine.
I think he will find the object of his desire. Even though he does not know what the song means, he does relate it to Aslan. Clearly the song contributes to his longing. The song must have come from Aslan and the longing is also related to Alsan so I think he will find the object of his desire.

5. What do you think of the way in which Drinian and Caspian talk about the events on Galma?
They converse as friends rather than king and captain. Caspian doesn’t want to give the impression he was always victorious, but doesn’t deny that he was victorious as well. Drinian wants to make sure that it is known that Caspian did well in the tournament. He could be proud of Caspian, could be picking on him a little, or could be enjoying make Caspian a little uncomfortable or a combination thereof. Since Drinian’s next comment is about Caspian and the Duke’s daughter, I believe Drinian is teasing Caspain a little bit. Caspian’s complaints about the Duke’s daughter are shallow. While it would be nice if he had mentioned some other reasons for not liking her, it is consistent with his age and the culture for him to act that way.

6. In LWW, Lewis hints that Edmund's character might have been restored in part by Lucy's cordial. Why do you think it doesn't seem to change Eustace's disposition?
Eustace does not want to change. Eustace also has not had the advantage of talking with Aslan. Edmund’s talk with Aslan could have made him more receptive to the cordial as far as character change goes.

7. Why do you think Lewis writes, "Of course Caspian's ship was not that horrible thing, a galley rowed by slaves. ... and everyone ... had often taken a turn"?
To show what kind of a king Caspian is and what kind of a land Narnia is. Caspian is the kind of king who helps out and doesn’t take advantage over others. He does not have slaves on his ship.

8. Why do you think Lewis included the aside that Lucy feeds the chickens?
To show that she helps around the ship. Even though she is a queen, she is willing to do her share.

9. What do you make of Eustace's journal? How does it serve the story?
I like seeing his interruption of what is going on. It gives us an intimate look into his character. It doesn’t make me like him anymore, but it does make me more interested in him. Does he really believe that there is storm and he is the only one who sees it? Or is he simply trying to make himself superior to the others? (maybe the intended audience is someone else?) He clearly feels he is the victim and is being treated unfairly. Keeping track of his marks was a way to make him feel superior / show how good he is. Maybe his slant to his journal entries are for a similar purpose? I wonder if he always recorded his marks correctly…

10. Reepicheep's chivalry clashes with Eustace's modern sensibilities in this chapter. Whose perspective do you think is correct in regards to fighting? Why?
In this context, Reepicheep is correct. Eustace’s action was an attack, and thus Reepicheep has a right to defend himself and on more even terms. I think Eustace is a bit unclear on the meaning of a pacifist; grabbing someone by the tail and swinging him around is fighting.

11. What do you think Edmund means when he says it only makes Eustace worse if you try to be nice to him?
Eustace does not soften to kindness; he just does more of the same things he always does.

12. This chapter has a lot of description, both of the boat and situations. Which one stands out the most to you and why?
Unfortunately it is the description of when Reepicheep is swung around by his tail. I find it so easy to picture. I thought about it a lot when the movie was being made because it was one of the scenes I most wanted to see since they had the technology to do it well.
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Re: Chapter 2 - On Board the "Dawn Treader"

Postby aileth » Jul 15, 2016 8:10 am

1. Once again we find that time flows differently in Narnia than on Earth. How does this affect Edmund, Lucy, and Caspian? How do you think you would handle the situation?
It might have been a bit strange, but Caspian wouldn't have seemed that much older. On this occasion it was pleasant--one of the rare occasions--this one, and the one in LB. Half the time it seemed to be a more distressing event--think of Eustace's state of mind in SC.

2. Caspian's quest is to find his father's old friends. What about this quest is noble and honorable? How do you think this quest will turn out?
Caspian wishes to right a wrong, so the quest is quite honourable. And yes, since Aslan approved it, it must be all right. It is likely to be a success, guessing from the previous chapter's light tone, and seeing that the title of the book is not
The Doom of the Dawn-Treader (in Seven Agonizing Acts).

3. In Prince Caspian the trees were asleep and had been sleeping for quite some time. When do you think the Dryad sang to Reepicheep? Why did the Dryad sing to Reepicheep and not any other Narnians?
We aren't told how old Reepicheep was at the time of the voyage, merely that the dryad sang to him in his cradle. As others have pointed out, how deep was the sleep of the trees?

4. Reepicheep has a longing in his heart from when he was a young mouse. Have you ever had a longing like this? What was it? Do you think Reepicheep will find the object of his desire?
Most of my desires are rather trivial compared to his, except a similar desire for Aslan's Country. He seems a determined sort of chap, and as he says later on, he'll keep going as long as he can paddle and swim.

5. What do you think of the way in which Drinian and Caspian talk about the events on Galma?
They didn't seem to take it too seriously; perhaps Caspian had been unhorsed and his interest solicited enough that it just rolled off his shoulders. As for the squint and the freckles, well, most of us do look at others from a less than ideal perspective--she may have been a very nice girl. Though you never know--maybe they were being kinder to her than you'd think, seeing that they only mention her appearance. And if they were a bit unkind, Lewis makes up for it by Lucy's comment.

6. In LWW, Lewis hints that Edmund's character might have been restored in part by Lucy's cordial. Why do you think it doesn't seem to change Eustace's disposition?
Edmund's transformation had already begun; if the cordial helped, it was merely to restore him completely. At this point Eustace was still unrepentant and unwilling to change; the cordial could remove his seasickness, but there was no magic wand able to wipe the scowl off his face.

7. Why do you think Lewis writes, "Of course Caspian's ship was not that horrible thing, a galley rowed by slaves. ... and everyone ... had often taken a turn"?
Possibly because, as wagga notes, many of our world's galleys were slave-driven; he might also have wanted to make a contrast with the situation in Chapter 3.

8. Why do you think Lewis included the aside that Lucy feeds the chickens?
To show how quickly she feels at home?

9. What do you make of Eustace's journal? How does it serve the story?
You'd have to be really obtuse to fall for Eustace's point of view, yet you can see the inner workings of his mind, and why he thinks he is right. Describing him solely from a third person view would not be so convincing, I think.

10. Reepicheep's chivalry clashes with Eustace's modern sensibilities in this chapter. Whose perspective do you think is correct in regards to fighting? Why?
Reepicheep is a wee mite over-eager--he sounds like the Frenchmen of the Three Musketeers era: ready to fight at the drop of a hat, and willing to drop it themselves. All in the interests of chivalry, of course. I think you're right, Twigs, that Eustace didn't quite understand the concept of pacifism correctly (to put it mildly). He certainly refused to admit that he was the aggressor. Thus it was quite suitable for him to be chastised by flat of sword--seemingly Lewis's favourite way of dealing with cowards and bullies.

11. What do you think Edmund means when he says it only makes Eustace worse if you try to be nice to him?
Eustace thinks that he deserves the best kind of treatment already, and has no sense of gratitude. He seems to mistake kindness for weakness, and is perfectly willing to take advantage of it.

12. This chapter has a lot of description, both of the boat and situations. Which one stands out the most to you and why?
While Lucy is given the biggest (and presumably best) cabin, I find the description of the lower cabin windows quite charming, with the golden and green lights changing as the panes were in the water and out. Perhaps not so charming in a storm, but there you have it.

Also, there are at least three mentions of Reepicheep's hard stare directed at various people, including Drinian. Reminds me of a certain Paddington Bear, whose disconcerting look could fluster the most haughty of people. Wonder if Michael Bond read this.

Wagga wrote:Why does he resent Edmund, in particular, so much?

A most interesting question, really. I mean, Eustace despises Lucy for being a girl, a fairly typical boy reaction, as far as it goes.

But Edmund was far and away more mature than he was--he had not been Edmund the Just so many years for nothing. Eustace probably resented the fact, for admitting it would have meant that he was not so superior as he liked to think himself. Sure, Edmund wasn't perfect, and he got irritated by his beastly cousin, but he was less likely to have lowered himself to the kind of behaviour that Eustace would expect from his peers. He didn't seem to have a very high expectations of behaviour, did he?

I suspect that Eustace would have looked up to Edmund a great deal if he had been an ordinary boy. Due to his upbringing, he couldn't admit to feelings of that sort, even to himself.
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