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Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: Apr 01, 2017 12:47 pm
by mm1991
I voted yes. But only if they keep it to a minimum.

Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: Apr 01, 2017 2:18 pm
by The Rose-Tree Dryad
^I just noticed that the quote in your signature has a decidedly Glimfeather-ish syntax, mm1991. :))

I finally voted tu-whoo, since I want at least a few. ;)

Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: May 12, 2017 4:54 pm
by waggawerewolf27
Reading room participation is a great way to take a fresh look at Silver Chair. :D And at Glimfeather, in particular.

Much of the humour about Tu-whoo'ing or not tu-whooing when dealing with owls, is to do with humans imitating owls, and not the other way around. Whilst it might be cheesy for a movie Glimfeather to speak how we consider owls to speak, the fact is that Glimfeather is an owl, a proper owl, who acts and eats like one. And would speak like one, rather than an average conspirator or politician, even if he goes to an owlish parliamentary meeting.

Humour in SC is also in the interactions between different characters. EG when Glimfeather escorts Jill and Eustace to meet Trumpkin, who is going deaf, to see what help they can get. Trumpkin's deafness may make funny dialogue, but it might also be a problem for Narnians and would-be missing prince seekers. A few well-placed tu-whoos, like a speech impediment, would certainly illustrate exactly why not greeting Caspian at once has left Eustace and Jill out on a limb, and why Trumpkin, through no fault of his own, might have become a bit too much like Governor Gumpas over the years in dealing with business.

Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: May 13, 2017 12:50 pm
by Movie Aristotle
I think it could work once in the movie, if they play it as if it is a colloquialism. He comes from owl culture. Why shouldn't it have a few sayings of its own?

I imagine it as something like "beards and bedsteads" from Prince Caspian. It doesn't make much sense, but it works to add character.

Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: May 16, 2017 1:45 pm
by Pattertwigs Pal
Movie Aristotle wrote:I think it could work once in the movie, if they play it as if it is a colloquialism. He comes from owl culture. Why shouldn't it have a few sayings of its own?

I like the idea of it being like a colloquialism. I feel that a lot of SC is about different cultures. This could really help establish the Owl Culture. However, I would like it in there more than once. ;)) Think about it. The Owls probably don't interact with other Narnians for more than a few hours a day. They probably spent most of their time in the company of each other so it makes sense they would have more of a dialect than other animals that were in previous books. Personally, I'd be thrilled if they have Glimfeather speak as Lewis his lines. However, if they want to make it more of an owl noise like fk suggests, I will be okay about it.

Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: May 16, 2017 6:17 pm
by PhelanVelvel
This is such a good question. Personally, I always interpreted the "tu-whoo" in the book as onomatopoeia. I imagined Glimfeather was actually hooting like an owl a bit at the end of his sentences. The rhyming could be cute if executed properly. I think balancing the silliness of the rhyming with an overall slower voice would work.

Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: May 21, 2017 3:04 pm
by waggawerewolf27
You are right of course. But Trumpkin told Glimfeather to speak more slowly.......:ymdevil: :D

Re: Tu-whoo or not tu-whoo? That is the question.

PostPosted: May 21, 2017 3:10 pm
by fantasia_kitty
Somebody should have submitted THIS question to Joe Johnston! :))